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WikipediaWikipedia describes the philosophy of mathematics as

The philosophy of mathematics is the branch of philosophy that studies the assumptions, foundations, and implications of mathematics, and purports to provide a viewpoint of the nature and methodology of mathematics, and to understand the place of mathematics in people's lives. The logical and structural nature of mathematics itself makes this study both broad and unique among its philosophical counterparts.

In particular mathematical realism is described in that article as

Mathematical realism, like realism in general, holds that mathematical entities exist independently of the human mind. Thus humans do not invent mathematics, but rather discover it, and any other intelligent beings in the universe would presumably do the same. In this point of view, there is really one sort of mathematics that can be discovered; triangles, for example, are real entities, not the creations of the human mind.

Let us consider the question in the title:

Is there an idea of non-spatial reality in philosophy?

If we consider the natural numbers from the perspective of mathematical realism which is a position in the philosophy of mathematics these objects would be kind of objective reality which "exist independently of the human mind." They have a certain algebraic structure perhaps and even an order relationship. However, the natural numbers need not have a metric relation although one often thinks of the natural numbers as embedded within the real number line. The real number line has a metric based on the difference between two points on that number line.

The natural numbers are, without that real metric, or for that matter any metric relationship between two natural numbers, a kind of reality that is non-spatial.

As the OP notes:

Information does not need to be arranged in space. Instead, information precedes space (in my view).

This would be illustrated by the natural numbers given a philosophy of mathematical realism where the natural numbers are not assigned a metric.


Reference

Wikipedia, "Philosophy of mathematics" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophy_of_mathematics

Wikipedia describes the philosophy of mathematics as

The philosophy of mathematics is the branch of philosophy that studies the assumptions, foundations, and implications of mathematics, and purports to provide a viewpoint of the nature and methodology of mathematics, and to understand the place of mathematics in people's lives. The logical and structural nature of mathematics itself makes this study both broad and unique among its philosophical counterparts.

In particular mathematical realism is described in that article as

Mathematical realism, like realism in general, holds that mathematical entities exist independently of the human mind. Thus humans do not invent mathematics, but rather discover it, and any other intelligent beings in the universe would presumably do the same. In this point of view, there is really one sort of mathematics that can be discovered; triangles, for example, are real entities, not the creations of the human mind.

Let us consider the question in the title:

Is there an idea of non-spatial reality in philosophy?

If we consider the natural numbers from the perspective of mathematical realism which is a position in the philosophy of mathematics these objects would be kind of objective reality which "exist independently of the human mind." They have a certain algebraic structure perhaps and even an order relationship. However, the natural numbers need not have a metric relation although one often thinks of the natural numbers as embedded within the real number line. The real number line has a metric based on the difference between two points on that number line.

The natural numbers are, without that real metric, or for that matter any metric relationship between two natural numbers, a kind of reality that is non-spatial.

As the OP notes:

Information does not need to be arranged in space. Instead, information precedes space (in my view).

This would be illustrated by the natural numbers given a philosophy of mathematical realism where the natural numbers are not assigned a metric.

Wikipedia describes the philosophy of mathematics as

The philosophy of mathematics is the branch of philosophy that studies the assumptions, foundations, and implications of mathematics, and purports to provide a viewpoint of the nature and methodology of mathematics, and to understand the place of mathematics in people's lives. The logical and structural nature of mathematics itself makes this study both broad and unique among its philosophical counterparts.

In particular mathematical realism is described in that article as

Mathematical realism, like realism in general, holds that mathematical entities exist independently of the human mind. Thus humans do not invent mathematics, but rather discover it, and any other intelligent beings in the universe would presumably do the same. In this point of view, there is really one sort of mathematics that can be discovered; triangles, for example, are real entities, not the creations of the human mind.

Let us consider the question in the title:

Is there an idea of non-spatial reality in philosophy?

If we consider the natural numbers from the perspective of mathematical realism which is a position in the philosophy of mathematics these objects would be kind of objective reality which "exist independently of the human mind." They have a certain algebraic structure perhaps and even an order relationship. However, the natural numbers need not have a metric relation although one often thinks of the natural numbers as embedded within the real number line. The real number line has a metric based on the difference between two points on that number line.

The natural numbers are, without that real metric, or for that matter any metric relationship between two natural numbers, a kind of reality that is non-spatial.

As the OP notes:

Information does not need to be arranged in space. Instead, information precedes space (in my view).

This would be illustrated by the natural numbers given a philosophy of mathematical realism where the natural numbers are not assigned a metric.


Reference

Wikipedia, "Philosophy of mathematics" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophy_of_mathematics

1
source | link

Wikipedia describes the philosophy of mathematics as

The philosophy of mathematics is the branch of philosophy that studies the assumptions, foundations, and implications of mathematics, and purports to provide a viewpoint of the nature and methodology of mathematics, and to understand the place of mathematics in people's lives. The logical and structural nature of mathematics itself makes this study both broad and unique among its philosophical counterparts.

In particular mathematical realism is described in that article as

Mathematical realism, like realism in general, holds that mathematical entities exist independently of the human mind. Thus humans do not invent mathematics, but rather discover it, and any other intelligent beings in the universe would presumably do the same. In this point of view, there is really one sort of mathematics that can be discovered; triangles, for example, are real entities, not the creations of the human mind.

Let us consider the question in the title:

Is there an idea of non-spatial reality in philosophy?

If we consider the natural numbers from the perspective of mathematical realism which is a position in the philosophy of mathematics these objects would be kind of objective reality which "exist independently of the human mind." They have a certain algebraic structure perhaps and even an order relationship. However, the natural numbers need not have a metric relation although one often thinks of the natural numbers as embedded within the real number line. The real number line has a metric based on the difference between two points on that number line.

The natural numbers are, without that real metric, or for that matter any metric relationship between two natural numbers, a kind of reality that is non-spatial.

As the OP notes:

Information does not need to be arranged in space. Instead, information precedes space (in my view).

This would be illustrated by the natural numbers given a philosophy of mathematical realism where the natural numbers are not assigned a metric.