4 replaced http://philosophy.stackexchange.com/ with https://philosophy.stackexchange.com/
source | link

Note: Whether this is actually an answer as opposed to an extended comment is debatable. I write it not as an answer (because I don't actually believe your question has an answer), but as "the closest one can get" to an answer. At any rate, I've turned it into a community wiki so I don't get reputation for it.

The crossroad you have come to is common, and you should be proud you picked up on it: It's a telling sign that you actually understand determinism; a concept which — even after many students of philosophy graduate with their degrees — I can assure you many never fully grasp.

You should note that there are dozens of different versions of compatibilism, each sometimes as radically different from each other as they are from hard determinism or libertarianism. I reckon some of the early versions were designed as a sort of "easing theory", published in philosophical journals as a "middle ground" to "ease" the academic community into this concept of determinism without seeming too radical. At any rate I have yet to read a convincing compatibilist argument myself, usually they just convolute terms like "freedom" and "determined" by redefining them in slightly different ways that supposedly don't conflict with (hard) determinism. Why do they do this? Because humans are not good at giving up things they are used to, or that they cherish. One of these things is the notion of moral responsibility, and determinism destroys this notion. Determinism also destroys the notion of praise (how can you praise someone for an action they took that was entirely inevitable, that wasn't of their own choosing?). This, in my opinion, is the real source of compatibilism: it is merely an unwillingness to accept that we may very well be automata, peering out the window of a robotic body, so to speak.

I suggest you take a look at the SEP article on compatibilism and see if any arguments are convincing to you, and if not, no fear — simply cast them aside. I also recommend (one of my personal favorites) Daniel Dennet's Elbow Room. He claims to be a compatibilist himself, but his writing all but screams hard determinism. His work helped me formulate my own position, which I write briefly about in my answer to this questionmy answer to this question.

Lastly, here's another question you might find interestinganother question you might find interesting regarding choice.

Note: Whether this is actually an answer as opposed to an extended comment is debatable. I write it not as an answer (because I don't actually believe your question has an answer), but as "the closest one can get" to an answer. At any rate, I've turned it into a community wiki so I don't get reputation for it.

The crossroad you have come to is common, and you should be proud you picked up on it: It's a telling sign that you actually understand determinism; a concept which — even after many students of philosophy graduate with their degrees — I can assure you many never fully grasp.

You should note that there are dozens of different versions of compatibilism, each sometimes as radically different from each other as they are from hard determinism or libertarianism. I reckon some of the early versions were designed as a sort of "easing theory", published in philosophical journals as a "middle ground" to "ease" the academic community into this concept of determinism without seeming too radical. At any rate I have yet to read a convincing compatibilist argument myself, usually they just convolute terms like "freedom" and "determined" by redefining them in slightly different ways that supposedly don't conflict with (hard) determinism. Why do they do this? Because humans are not good at giving up things they are used to, or that they cherish. One of these things is the notion of moral responsibility, and determinism destroys this notion. Determinism also destroys the notion of praise (how can you praise someone for an action they took that was entirely inevitable, that wasn't of their own choosing?). This, in my opinion, is the real source of compatibilism: it is merely an unwillingness to accept that we may very well be automata, peering out the window of a robotic body, so to speak.

I suggest you take a look at the SEP article on compatibilism and see if any arguments are convincing to you, and if not, no fear — simply cast them aside. I also recommend (one of my personal favorites) Daniel Dennet's Elbow Room. He claims to be a compatibilist himself, but his writing all but screams hard determinism. His work helped me formulate my own position, which I write briefly about in my answer to this question.

Lastly, here's another question you might find interesting regarding choice.

Note: Whether this is actually an answer as opposed to an extended comment is debatable. I write it not as an answer (because I don't actually believe your question has an answer), but as "the closest one can get" to an answer. At any rate, I've turned it into a community wiki so I don't get reputation for it.

The crossroad you have come to is common, and you should be proud you picked up on it: It's a telling sign that you actually understand determinism; a concept which — even after many students of philosophy graduate with their degrees — I can assure you many never fully grasp.

You should note that there are dozens of different versions of compatibilism, each sometimes as radically different from each other as they are from hard determinism or libertarianism. I reckon some of the early versions were designed as a sort of "easing theory", published in philosophical journals as a "middle ground" to "ease" the academic community into this concept of determinism without seeming too radical. At any rate I have yet to read a convincing compatibilist argument myself, usually they just convolute terms like "freedom" and "determined" by redefining them in slightly different ways that supposedly don't conflict with (hard) determinism. Why do they do this? Because humans are not good at giving up things they are used to, or that they cherish. One of these things is the notion of moral responsibility, and determinism destroys this notion. Determinism also destroys the notion of praise (how can you praise someone for an action they took that was entirely inevitable, that wasn't of their own choosing?). This, in my opinion, is the real source of compatibilism: it is merely an unwillingness to accept that we may very well be automata, peering out the window of a robotic body, so to speak.

I suggest you take a look at the SEP article on compatibilism and see if any arguments are convincing to you, and if not, no fear — simply cast them aside. I also recommend (one of my personal favorites) Daniel Dennet's Elbow Room. He claims to be a compatibilist himself, but his writing all but screams hard determinism. His work helped me formulate my own position, which I write briefly about in my answer to this question.

Lastly, here's another question you might find interesting regarding choice.

3 deleted 21 characters in body
source | link

Note: Whether this is actually an answer as opposed to an extended comment is debatable. I write it not as an answer (because I don't actually believe your question has an answer), but as "the closest one can get" to an answer. At any rate, I've turned it into a community wiki so I don't get reputation for it.

The crossroad you have come to is common, and you should be proud you picked up on it: It's a telling sign that you actually understand determinism; a concept which — even after many students of philosophy graduate with their degrees — I can assure you many never fully grasp.

You should note that there are dozens of different versions of compatibilism, each sometimes as radically different from each other as they are from hard determinism or libertarianism. I reckon some of the early versions were designed as a sort of "easing theory", published in philosophical journals as a "middle ground" to "ease" the academic community into this concept of determinism without seeming too radical. At any rate I have yet to read a convincing compatibilist argument myself, usually they just convolute terms like "freedom" and "determined" by redefining them in slightly different ways that supposedly don't conflict with (hard) determinism. Why do they do this? Because humans are not good at giving up things they are used to, or that they cherish. One of these things is the notion of moral responsibility, and determinism destroys this notion. Determinism also destroys the notion of praise (how can you praise someone for an action they took that was entirely inevitable, that wasn't of their own choosing?). This, in my opinion, is the real source of compatibilism: it is merely an unwillingness to accept that we may very well be automata, peering out the window of a robotic body, so to speak.

I suggest you take a look at the SEP article on compatibilism and see if any arguments are convincing to you, and if not, no fear — simply cast them aside. I also recommend (one of my personal favorites) Daniel Dennet's Elbow Room. He claims to be a compatibilist himself, but his writing all but screams hard determinism. His work helped me formulate my own position, which I write briefly about in my answer to this question.

Lastly, here's another question you might find interesting regarding choice.

Hope that helps! :)

Note: Whether this is actually an answer as opposed to an extended comment is debatable. I write it not as an answer (because I don't actually believe your question has an answer), but as "the closest one can get" to an answer. At any rate, I've turned it into a community wiki so I don't get reputation for it.

The crossroad you have come to is common, and you should be proud you picked up on it: It's a telling sign that you actually understand determinism; a concept which — even after many students of philosophy graduate with their degrees — I can assure you many never fully grasp.

You should note that there are dozens of different versions of compatibilism, each sometimes as radically different from each other as they are from hard determinism or libertarianism. I reckon some of the early versions were designed as a sort of "easing theory", published in philosophical journals as a "middle ground" to "ease" the academic community into this concept of determinism without seeming too radical. At any rate I have yet to read a convincing compatibilist argument myself, usually they just convolute terms like "freedom" and "determined" by redefining them in slightly different ways that supposedly don't conflict with (hard) determinism. Why do they do this? Because humans are not good at giving up things they are used to, or that they cherish. One of these things is the notion of moral responsibility, and determinism destroys this notion. Determinism also destroys the notion of praise (how can you praise someone for an action they took that was entirely inevitable, that wasn't of their own choosing?). This, in my opinion, is the real source of compatibilism: it is merely an unwillingness to accept that we may very well be automata, peering out the window of a robotic body, so to speak.

I suggest you take a look at the SEP article on compatibilism and see if any arguments are convincing to you, and if not, no fear — simply cast them aside. I also recommend (one of my personal favorites) Daniel Dennet's Elbow Room. He claims to be a compatibilist himself, but his writing all but screams hard determinism. His work helped me formulate my own position, which I write briefly about in my answer to this question.

Lastly, here's another question you might find interesting regarding choice.

Hope that helps! :)

Note: Whether this is actually an answer as opposed to an extended comment is debatable. I write it not as an answer (because I don't actually believe your question has an answer), but as "the closest one can get" to an answer. At any rate, I've turned it into a community wiki so I don't get reputation for it.

The crossroad you have come to is common, and you should be proud you picked up on it: It's a telling sign that you actually understand determinism; a concept which — even after many students of philosophy graduate with their degrees — I can assure you many never fully grasp.

You should note that there are dozens of different versions of compatibilism, each sometimes as radically different from each other as they are from hard determinism or libertarianism. I reckon some of the early versions were designed as a sort of "easing theory", published in philosophical journals as a "middle ground" to "ease" the academic community into this concept of determinism without seeming too radical. At any rate I have yet to read a convincing compatibilist argument myself, usually they just convolute terms like "freedom" and "determined" by redefining them in slightly different ways that supposedly don't conflict with (hard) determinism. Why do they do this? Because humans are not good at giving up things they are used to, or that they cherish. One of these things is the notion of moral responsibility, and determinism destroys this notion. Determinism also destroys the notion of praise (how can you praise someone for an action they took that was entirely inevitable, that wasn't of their own choosing?). This, in my opinion, is the real source of compatibilism: it is merely an unwillingness to accept that we may very well be automata, peering out the window of a robotic body, so to speak.

I suggest you take a look at the SEP article on compatibilism and see if any arguments are convincing to you, and if not, no fear — simply cast them aside. I also recommend (one of my personal favorites) Daniel Dennet's Elbow Room. He claims to be a compatibilist himself, but his writing all but screams hard determinism. His work helped me formulate my own position, which I write briefly about in my answer to this question.

Lastly, here's another question you might find interesting regarding choice.

2 deleted 1 characters in body
source | link

Note: Whether this is actually an answer as opposed to an extended comment is debatable. I write it not as an answer (because I don't actually believe your question has an answer), but as "the closest one can get" to an answer. At any rate, I've turned it into a community wiki so I don't get reputation for it.

The crossroad you have come to is common, and you should be proud you picked up on it: It's a telling sign that you actually understand determinism; a concept which — even after many students of philosophy graduate with their degrees — I can assure you many never fully grasp.

You should note that there are dozens of different versions of compatibilism, each sometimes as radically different from each other as they are from hard determinism or libertarianism. I reckon some of the early versions were designed as a sort of "easing theory", published in philosophical journals as a "middle ground" to "ease" the academic community into this concept of determinism without seeming totoo radical. At any rate I have yet to read a convincing compatibilist argument myself, usually they just convolute terms like "freedom" and "determined" by redefining them in slightly different ways that doesn't necessarilysupposedly don't conflict with (hard) determinism. Why do they do this? Because humans are not good at giving up things they are used to, or that they cherish. One of these things is the notion of moral responsibility, and determinism destroys this notion. Determinism also destroys the notion of praise (how can you praise someone for an action they took that was entirely inevitable, that wasn't of their own choosing?). This, in my opinion, is the real source of compatibilism: it is merely an unwillingness to accept that we may very well be automata, peering out the window of a robotic body, so to speak.

I suggest you take a look at the SEP article on compatibilism and see if any arguments are convincing to you, and if not, no fear — simply cast them aside. I also recommend (one of my personal favorites) which is Daniel Dennet's Elbow Room. He claims to be a compatibilist himself, but his writing all but screams hard determinism. His work helped me formulate my own position, which I write briefly about in my answer to this question.

Lastly, here's another question you might find interesting regarding choice.

Hope that helps! :)

Note: Whether this is actually an answer as opposed to an extended comment is debatable. I write it not as an answer (because I don't actually believe your question has an answer), but as "the closest one can get" to an answer. At any rate, I've turned it into a community wiki so I don't get reputation for it.

The crossroad you have come to is common, and you should be proud you picked up on it: It's a telling sign that you actually understand determinism; a concept which — even after many students of philosophy graduate with their degrees — I can assure you many never fully grasp.

You should note that there are dozens of different versions of compatibilism, each sometimes as radically different from each other as they are from hard determinism or libertarianism. I reckon some of the early versions were designed as a sort of "easing theory", published in philosophical journals as a "middle ground" to "ease" the academic community into this concept of determinism without seeming to radical. At any rate I have yet to read a convincing compatibilist argument myself, usually they just convolute terms like "freedom" and "determined" by redefining them in slightly different ways that doesn't necessarily conflict with (hard) determinism. Why do they do this? Because humans are not good at giving up things they are used to, or that they cherish. One of these things is the notion of moral responsibility, and determinism destroys this notion. Determinism also destroys the notion of praise (how can you praise someone for an action they took that was entirely inevitable, that wasn't of their own choosing?). This, in my opinion, is the real source of compatibilism: it is merely an unwillingness to accept that we may very well be automata, peering out the window of a robotic body, so to speak.

I suggest you take a look at the SEP article on compatibilism and see if any are convincing to you, and if not, no fear — simply cast them aside. I also recommend (one of my personal favorites) which is Daniel Dennet's Elbow Room. He claims to be a compatibilist himself, but his writing all but screams hard determinism. His work helped me formulate my own position, which I write briefly about in my answer to this question.

Lastly, here's another question you might find interesting regarding choice.

Hope that helps! :)

Note: Whether this is actually an answer as opposed to an extended comment is debatable. I write it not as an answer (because I don't actually believe your question has an answer), but as "the closest one can get" to an answer. At any rate, I've turned it into a community wiki so I don't get reputation for it.

The crossroad you have come to is common, and you should be proud you picked up on it: It's a telling sign that you actually understand determinism; a concept which — even after many students of philosophy graduate with their degrees — I can assure you many never fully grasp.

You should note that there are dozens of different versions of compatibilism, each sometimes as radically different from each other as they are from hard determinism or libertarianism. I reckon some of the early versions were designed as a sort of "easing theory", published in philosophical journals as a "middle ground" to "ease" the academic community into this concept of determinism without seeming too radical. At any rate I have yet to read a convincing compatibilist argument myself, usually they just convolute terms like "freedom" and "determined" by redefining them in slightly different ways that supposedly don't conflict with (hard) determinism. Why do they do this? Because humans are not good at giving up things they are used to, or that they cherish. One of these things is the notion of moral responsibility, and determinism destroys this notion. Determinism also destroys the notion of praise (how can you praise someone for an action they took that was entirely inevitable, that wasn't of their own choosing?). This, in my opinion, is the real source of compatibilism: it is merely an unwillingness to accept that we may very well be automata, peering out the window of a robotic body, so to speak.

I suggest you take a look at the SEP article on compatibilism and see if any arguments are convincing to you, and if not, no fear — simply cast them aside. I also recommend (one of my personal favorites) Daniel Dennet's Elbow Room. He claims to be a compatibilist himself, but his writing all but screams hard determinism. His work helped me formulate my own position, which I write briefly about in my answer to this question.

Lastly, here's another question you might find interesting regarding choice.

Hope that helps! :)

    Post Made Community Wiki by stoicfury
1
source | link