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Under the argument of recollection, what would the answer to the following scenario?

A young child has not learned a single thing about geometrical shapes. If a person were to draw a triangle and show the child, the child, surely, would not know what this figure is. It would only be until the child is told that this is a triangle with the property of having three sides, with each anglethe angles equaling 180 degrees, and etc.

Since the argument of recollection argues that we do not gain knowledge through sense-perception, how are we ever supposed to be reminded of the Form of a triangle? Suppose that the child is never told explicitly that it is a triangle; does the child have some thought that this triangle represents something greater and intelligible? Or is it only when he starts to see multiple triangles (each one increasing in its participation in the Form of the triangle) that he starts to recognize the idea of absolute "triangle-ness?"

Wouldn't this also imply that it requires sense-perception to even acquire knowledge about the thing itself, let alone the Form of the thing?

Under the argument of recollection, what would the answer to the following scenario?

A young child has not learned a single thing about geometrical shapes. If a person were to draw a triangle and show the child, the child, surely, would not know what this figure is. It would only be until the child is told that this is a triangle with the property of having three sides, with each angle equaling 180 degrees, and etc.

Since the argument of recollection argues that we do not gain knowledge through sense-perception, how are we ever supposed to be reminded of the Form of a triangle? Suppose that the child is never told explicitly that it is a triangle; does the child have some thought that this triangle represents something greater and intelligible? Or is it only when he starts to see multiple triangles (each one increasing in its participation in the Form of the triangle) that he starts to recognize the idea of absolute "triangle-ness?"

Wouldn't this also imply that it requires sense-perception to even acquire knowledge about the thing itself, let alone the Form of the thing?

Under the argument of recollection, what would the answer to the following scenario?

A young child has not learned a single thing about geometrical shapes. If a person were to draw a triangle and show the child, the child, surely, would not know what this figure is. It would only be until the child is told that this is a triangle with the property of having three sides, with the angles equaling 180 degrees, and etc.

Since the argument of recollection argues that we do not gain knowledge through sense-perception, how are we ever supposed to be reminded of the Form of a triangle? Suppose that the child is never told explicitly that it is a triangle; does the child have some thought that this triangle represents something greater and intelligible? Or is it only when he starts to see multiple triangles (each one increasing in its participation in the Form of the triangle) that he starts to recognize the idea of absolute "triangle-ness?"

Wouldn't this also imply that it requires sense-perception to even acquire knowledge about the thing itself, let alone the Form of the thing?

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Question about the Argument of Recollection from Plato's Phaedo

Under the argument of recollection, what would the answer to the following scenario?

A young child has not learned a single thing about geometrical shapes. If a person were to draw a triangle and show the child, the child, surely, would not know what this figure is. It would only be until the child is told that this is a triangle with the property of having three sides, with each angle equaling 180 degrees, and etc.

Since the argument of recollection argues that we do not gain knowledge through sense-perception, how are we ever supposed to be reminded of the Form of a triangle? Suppose that the child is never told explicitly that it is a triangle; does the child have some thought that this triangle represents something greater and intelligible? Or is it only when he starts to see multiple triangles (each one increasing in its participation in the Form of the triangle) that he starts to recognize the idea of absolute "triangle-ness?"

Wouldn't this also imply that it requires sense-perception to even acquire knowledge about the thing itself, let alone the Form of the thing?