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Welcome, Richard.

Although the theory of Forms is not explicitly present in the Meno, Plato plainly is working with ideas very close to it. (The use of eide [forms], 72C, and ousiai [realities)], 72B,The child does not prove the presence ofgain knowledge through sense experience, as you rightly represent the theoryargument.)

The claim is that in Meno, 82B-85C, Socrates S/he already has not taught the slave boy anything, so the geometrical knowledge he has at the close of the exchange must have a different source. That source is conjectured to be anthrough acquaintance with geometrical concepts and reasoning gainedthe Forms in a priorprevious incarnations - prior knowledge. His sense-based exposure to geometry in the conversation with Socrates recalls that prior knowledge.

In your terms the diagram that Socrates drawsRecollection - a transient sensiblerecognition - hasis possible because there is a resemblance to the Forms of the Squarebetween sensible particulars and the Triangle, just asForms in which they 'participate' (metechei). Even though a circle you might draw hasparticular that participates in F, a resemblance toForm, is imperfectly F, it is sufficiently similar ('participates in', to use Plato's language in the Republicechomen) to F for recollection of the Formfrom F to be activated by sense experience of the Circleparticular. The slave boy recogniseschild is reminded of F by the particular's resemblance to F.

References

Norio Fujisawa, though'῎Εχειν, Μετέχειν, and Idioms of course without realising that this is what is happening'Paradeigmatism' in Plato's Theory of Forms', Phronesis, Vol. 19, No. 1 (1974), pp. 30-58.

It is questionable that Socrates has not through his questions taughtDavid Sedley, 'Form-Particular Resemblance in Plato's "Phaedo"', Proceedings of the boy but that is a separate issueAristotelian Society, Vol. 106 (2006), pp. 311-327.

Welcome, Richard.

Although the theory of Forms is not explicitly present in the Meno, Plato plainly is working with ideas very close to it. (The use of eide [forms], 72C, and ousiai [realities)], 72B, does not prove the presence of the theory.)

The claim is that in Meno, 82B-85C, Socrates has not taught the slave boy anything, so the geometrical knowledge he has at the close of the exchange must have a different source. That source is conjectured to be an acquaintance with geometrical concepts and reasoning gained in a prior incarnations - prior knowledge. His sense-based exposure to geometry in the conversation with Socrates recalls that prior knowledge.

In your terms the diagram that Socrates draws - a transient sensible - has a resemblance to the Forms of the Square and the Triangle, just as a circle you might draw has a resemblance to ('participates in', to use Plato's language in the Republic) the Form of the Circle. The slave boy recognises the resemblance, though of course without realising that this is what is happening.

It is questionable that Socrates has not through his questions taught the boy but that is a separate issue.

Welcome, Richard.

The child does not gain knowledge through sense experience, as you rightly represent the argument. S/he already has knowledge through acquaintance with the Forms in previous incarnations.

Recollection - recognition - is possible because there is a resemblance between sensible particulars and the Forms in which they 'participate' (metechei). Even though a particular that participates in F, a Form, is imperfectly F, it is sufficiently similar (echomen) to F for recollection of the from F to be activated by sense experience of the particular. The child is reminded of F by the particular's resemblance to F.

References

Norio Fujisawa, '῎Εχειν, Μετέχειν, and Idioms of 'Paradeigmatism' in Plato's Theory of Forms', Phronesis, Vol. 19, No. 1 (1974), pp. 30-58.

David Sedley, 'Form-Particular Resemblance in Plato's "Phaedo"', Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Vol. 106 (2006), pp. 311-327.

    Post Undeleted by Geoffrey Thomas
    Post Deleted by Geoffrey Thomas
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Welcome, Richard.

Although the theory of Forms is not explicitly present in the Meno, Plato plainly is working with ideas very close to it. (The use of eide [forms], 72C, and ousiai [realities)], 72B, does not prove the presence of the theory.)

The claim is that in Meno, 82B-85C, Socrates has not taught the slave boy anything, so the geometrical knowledge he has at the close of the exchange must have a different source. That source is conjectured to be an acquaintance with geometrical concepts and reasoning gained in a previous existenceprior incarnations - prior knowledge. His sense-based exposure to geometry in the conversation with Socrates recalls that prior knowledge.

In your terms the diagram that Socrates draws - a transient sensible - has a resemblance to the FormForms of the Square and the Triangle, just as a circle you might draw has a resemblance to ('participates in', to use Plato's language in the Republic) the Form of the Circle. The slave boy recognises the resemblance, though of course without realising that this is what is happening.

It is questionable that Socrates has not through his questions taught the boy but that is a separate issue.

Welcome, Richard.

Although the theory of Forms is not explicitly present in the Meno, Plato plainly is working with ideas very close to it. (The use of eide [forms], 72C, and ousiai [realities)], 72B, does not prove the presence of the theory.)

The claim is that in Meno, 82B-85C, Socrates has not taught the slave boy anything, so the geometrical knowledge he has at the close of the exchange must have a different source. That source is conjectured to be an acquaintance with geometrical concepts and reasoning gained in a previous existence - prior knowledge. His sense-based exposure to geometry in the conversation with Socrates recalls that prior knowledge.

In your terms the diagram that Socrates draws - a transient sensible - has a resemblance to the Form of the Triangle, just as a circle you might draw has a resemblance to ('participates in', to use Plato's language in the Republic) the Form of the Circle. The slave boy recognises the resemblance, though of course without realising that this is what is happening.

It is questionable that Socrates has not through his questions taught the boy but that is a separate issue.

Welcome, Richard.

Although the theory of Forms is not explicitly present in the Meno, Plato plainly is working with ideas very close to it. (The use of eide [forms], 72C, and ousiai [realities)], 72B, does not prove the presence of the theory.)

The claim is that in Meno, 82B-85C, Socrates has not taught the slave boy anything, so the geometrical knowledge he has at the close of the exchange must have a different source. That source is conjectured to be an acquaintance with geometrical concepts and reasoning gained in a prior incarnations - prior knowledge. His sense-based exposure to geometry in the conversation with Socrates recalls that prior knowledge.

In your terms the diagram that Socrates draws - a transient sensible - has a resemblance to the Forms of the Square and the Triangle, just as a circle you might draw has a resemblance to ('participates in', to use Plato's language in the Republic) the Form of the Circle. The slave boy recognises the resemblance, though of course without realising that this is what is happening.

It is questionable that Socrates has not through his questions taught the boy but that is a separate issue.

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Welcome, Richard.

Although the theory of Forms is not explicitly present in the Meno, Plato plainly is working with ideas very close to it. (The use of eide [forms], 72C, and ousiai [realities)], 72B, does not prove the presence of the theory.)

The claim is that in Meno, 82B-85C, Socrates has not taught the slave boy anything, so the geometrical knowledge he has at the close of the exchange must have a different source. That source is conjectured to be an acquaintance with geometrical concepts and reasoning gained in a previous existence - prior knowledge. His sense-based exposure to geometry in the conversation with Socrates recalls that prior knowledge.

In your terms the diagram that Socrates draws - a transient sensible - has a resemblance to the Form of the Triangle, just as a circle you might draw has a resemblance to ('participates in', to use Plato's language in the Republic) the Form of the Circle. The slave boy recognises the resemblance, though of course without realising that this is what is happening.

It is questionable that Socrates has not through his questions taught the boy but that is a separate issue.

Welcome, Richard.

Although the theory of Forms is not explicitly present in the Meno, Plato plainly is working with ideas very close to it.

The claim is that Socrates has not taught the slave boy anything, so the geometrical knowledge he has at the close of the exchange must have a different source. That source is conjectured to be an acquaintance with geometrical concepts and reasoning gained in a previous existence - prior knowledge. His sense-based exposure to geometry in the conversation with Socrates recalls that prior knowledge.

In your terms the diagram that Socrates draws has a resemblance to the Form of the Triangle, just as a circle you might draw has a resemblance to ('participates in', to use Plato's language in the Republic) the Form of the Circle. The slave boy recognises the resemblance, though of course without realising that this is what is happening.

It is questionable that Socrates has not through his questions taught the boy but that is a separate issue.

Welcome, Richard.

Although the theory of Forms is not explicitly present in the Meno, Plato plainly is working with ideas very close to it. (The use of eide [forms], 72C, and ousiai [realities)], 72B, does not prove the presence of the theory.)

The claim is that in Meno, 82B-85C, Socrates has not taught the slave boy anything, so the geometrical knowledge he has at the close of the exchange must have a different source. That source is conjectured to be an acquaintance with geometrical concepts and reasoning gained in a previous existence - prior knowledge. His sense-based exposure to geometry in the conversation with Socrates recalls that prior knowledge.

In your terms the diagram that Socrates draws - a transient sensible - has a resemblance to the Form of the Triangle, just as a circle you might draw has a resemblance to ('participates in', to use Plato's language in the Republic) the Form of the Circle. The slave boy recognises the resemblance, though of course without realising that this is what is happening.

It is questionable that Socrates has not through his questions taught the boy but that is a separate issue.

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