Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
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Welcome to PSE, Kratz.

I don't recognise 'preservation in the memory of others' as any element of any consideration in Christian theology. A saint might be remembered for some exemplary quality of life but that's another matter.

What I do recall, however, is reading certain 19th-century thinkers who, having abandoned Christianity in its literal form as a set of true dogmasdoctrines, pressed the idea of preservation in the memory of others as a transformed or replacement version of immortality. This was the most we could reasonably hope for, given that any traditional idea of immortality was untenable. (I am merely summarising their view; my own views are nothing to the point.)

Chief among such writers as I have read were TH Green (1836-82) and Bernard Bosanquet (1848-1923). Bosanquet was more concerned than Green with personal immortality and its prospects. The topic is dealt with in the second volume of his Gifford Lectures, The Value and Destiny of the Individual (1913). Btw Bosanquet explicitly refers to Comte as stressing that we survive (only) in the memories we leave.

If you can get hold of it a valuable source is :

The destiny of the self in professor Bosanquet's theory Radoslav A. Tsanoff Philosophical Review 29 (1):59-79 (1920).

Welcome to PSE, Kratz.

I don't recognise 'preservation in the memory of others' as any element of any consideration in Christian theology. A saint might be remembered for some exemplary quality of life but that's another matter.

What I do recall, however, is reading certain 19th-century thinkers who, having abandoned Christianity in its literal form as a set of true dogmas, pressed the idea of preservation in the memory of others as a transformed or replacement version of immortality. This was the most we could reasonably hope for, given that any traditional idea of immortality was untenable. (I am merely summarising their view; my own views are nothing to the point.)

Chief among such writers as I have read were TH Green (1836-82) and Bernard Bosanquet (1848-1923). Bosanquet was more concerned than Green with personal immortality and its prospects. The topic is dealt with in the second volume of his Gifford Lectures, The Value and Destiny of the Individual (1913). Btw Bosanquet explicitly refers to Comte as stressing that we survive (only) in the memories we leave.

If you can get hold of it a valuable source is :

The destiny of the self in professor Bosanquet's theory Radoslav A. Tsanoff Philosophical Review 29 (1):59-79 (1920).

Welcome to PSE, Kratz.

I don't recognise 'preservation in the memory of others' as any element of any consideration in Christian theology. A saint might be remembered for some exemplary quality of life but that's another matter.

What I do recall, however, is reading certain 19th-century thinkers who, having abandoned Christianity in its literal form as a set of true doctrines, pressed the idea of preservation in the memory of others as a transformed or replacement version of immortality. This was the most we could reasonably hope for, given that any traditional idea of immortality was untenable. (I am merely summarising their view; my own views are nothing to the point.)

Chief among such writers as I have read were TH Green (1836-82) and Bernard Bosanquet (1848-1923). Bosanquet was more concerned than Green with personal immortality and its prospects. The topic is dealt with in the second volume of his Gifford Lectures, The Value and Destiny of the Individual (1913). Btw Bosanquet explicitly refers to Comte as stressing that we survive (only) in the memories we leave.

If you can get hold of it a valuable source is :

The destiny of the self in professor Bosanquet's theory Radoslav A. Tsanoff Philosophical Review 29 (1):59-79 (1920).

1
source | link

Welcome to PSE, Kratz.

I don't recognise 'preservation in the memory of others' as any element of any consideration in Christian theology. A saint might be remembered for some exemplary quality of life but that's another matter.

What I do recall, however, is reading certain 19th-century thinkers who, having abandoned Christianity in its literal form as a set of true dogmas, pressed the idea of preservation in the memory of others as a transformed or replacement version of immortality. This was the most we could reasonably hope for, given that any traditional idea of immortality was untenable. (I am merely summarising their view; my own views are nothing to the point.)

Chief among such writers as I have read were TH Green (1836-82) and Bernard Bosanquet (1848-1923). Bosanquet was more concerned than Green with personal immortality and its prospects. The topic is dealt with in the second volume of his Gifford Lectures, The Value and Destiny of the Individual (1913). Btw Bosanquet explicitly refers to Comte as stressing that we survive (only) in the memories we leave.

If you can get hold of it a valuable source is :

The destiny of the self in professor Bosanquet's theory Radoslav A. Tsanoff Philosophical Review 29 (1):59-79 (1920).