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There is no inconsistency.

First of all, we have to consider that the "real" Socrates and the main character in many Plato's dialogues, called Socrates, are obviously linked but not exactly the same person.

Plato had personal experience of Socrates and for sure he borrowed in many ways from Socrates, but in reading Plato's dialogues it is not easy to draw the line between him (Plato) and his teacher.

The method of asking and answering questions is presumably due to Socrates and Plato uses it in most of the dialogues.

Typical example is the Theaetetus where Socrates questions Theaetetus about key questionissue of the dialogue: “What is knowledge?”:

[145e] Socrates Then knowledge and wisdom are the same thing?

Theaetetus Yes.

Socrates Well, it is just this that I am in doubt about and cannot fully grasp by my own efforts—what knowledge really is.

The so-called Socratic method is aimed at aquiring the definition (the knowledge of the essence) starting from "common sense"common sense notions and (presumably) shared opinions and test them with a series of questions.

Thus, Socrates' approach has not as a result that "he knows nothing" but instead that, starting from an initial status of confusion or from seemingly certain assertions (expressing "false" knowledge), to inquire on them in order to attain real knowledge.

There is no inconsistency.

First of all, we have to consider that the "real" Socrates and the main character in many Plato's dialogues, called Socrates, are obviously linked but not exactly the same person.

Plato had personal experience of Socrates and for sure he borrowed in many ways from Socrates, but it is not easy to draw the line between him and his teacher.

The method of asking and answering questions is presumably due to Socrates and Plato uses it in most of the dialogues.

Typical example is the Theaetetus where Socrates questions Theaetetus about key question of the dialogue: “What is knowledge?”:

[145e] Socrates Then knowledge and wisdom are the same thing?

Theaetetus Yes.

Socrates Well, it is just this that I am in doubt about and cannot fully grasp by my own efforts—what knowledge really is.

The so-called Socratic method is aimed at aquiring the definition (the knowledge of the essence) starting from "common sense" notions and (presumably) shared opinions and test them with a series of questions.

Thus, Socrates' approach has not as a result that "he knows nothing" but instead that, starting from an initial status of confusion or from seemingly certain assertions (expressing "false" knowledge), to inquire on them in order to attain real knowledge.

There is no inconsistency.

First of all, we have to consider that the "real" Socrates and the main character in many Plato's dialogues, called Socrates, are obviously linked but not exactly the same person.

Plato had personal experience of Socrates and for sure he borrowed in many ways from Socrates, but in reading Plato's dialogues it is not easy to draw the line between him (Plato) and his teacher.

The method of asking and answering questions is presumably due to Socrates and Plato uses it in most of the dialogues.

Typical example is the Theaetetus where Socrates questions Theaetetus about key issue of the dialogue: “What is knowledge?”:

[145e] Socrates Then knowledge and wisdom are the same thing?

Theaetetus Yes.

Socrates Well, it is just this that I am in doubt about and cannot fully grasp by my own efforts—what knowledge really is.

The so-called Socratic method is aimed at aquiring the definition (the knowledge of the essence) starting from common sense notions and (presumably) shared opinions and test them with a series of questions.

Thus, Socrates' approach has not as a result that "he knows nothing" but instead that, starting from an initial status of confusion or from seemingly certain assertions (expressing "false" knowledge), to inquire on them in order to attain real knowledge.

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source | link

There is no inconsistency.

First of all, we have to consider that the "real" Socrates and the main character in many Plato's dialogues, called Socrates, are obviously linked but not exactly the same person.

Plato had personal experience of Socrates and for sure he borrowed in many ways from Socrates, but it is not easy to draw the line between him and his teacher.

The method of asking and answering questions is presumably due to Socrates and Plato uses it in most of the dialogues.

Typical example is the Theaetetus where Socrates questions Theaetetus about key question of the dialogue: “What is knowledge?”:

[145e] Socrates Then knowledge and wisdom are the same thing?

Theaetetus Yes.

Socrates Well, it is just this that I am in doubt about and cannot fully grasp by my own efforts—what knowledge really is.

The so-called Socratic method is aimed at aquiring the definition (the knowledge of the essence) starting from "common sense" notions and (presumably) shared opinions and test them with a series of questions.

Thus, Socrates' approach has not as a result that "he knows nothing" but instead that, starting from an initial status of confusion or from seemingly certain assertions (expressing "false" knowledge), to inquire on them in order to attain real knowledge.