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I think belief can be distinguished from faith. As I wrote in the parallel question on atheism, the essence of faith is a confidence or ability to trust in the present and future because of past reliability. I trust in my chair to not collapse because it's held me up thousands of times before. I have faith in my spouse and family to support me because they've been there for me in difficult times before. I don't have faith in my government to make good decisions for the betterment of my nation because they've shown themselves to be lily-livered and self serving.

It's easy to see how most theistic religions are faith based. Many have scriptures which tell a history of their god or gods being trustworthy. Many teach an ethical system which they believe is shown repeatedly to lead to human flourishing. Many encourage their people to share with their communities how their god or gods have supported them through difficult times. Religious people have faith when their past experience of the divine leads them to trust the divine for the future.

But it's also easy to see that many people with religious beliefs do not live faith-based lives. There are "Sunday" Christians, "Saturday" Jews, and "Friday" Muslims who attend their religious community's meeting but who live the rest of their week without their beliefs making a difference. And of course there are many people who might say they believe in God without ever attending a religious service! Many religious people do not trust their god or gods to help them in difficult times, and some may be convinced by certain apologetic arguments for the existence of the divine without having any personal experience of it. I even wonder if reincarnation may take the pressure off many Buddhist people to delve deeper into religious thought or to devote their life to carefully following their ethical principles because their belief in reincarnation means they will have unending lives to live more religiously in the future.

So theism is not necessarily faith based. But it is true that most of the world's religiousreligions do encourage faith-based living, and those who believe without it shaping the way they live are not considered good examples of their religions.

I think belief can be distinguished from faith. As I wrote in the parallel question on atheism, the essence of faith is a confidence or ability to trust in the present and future because of past reliability. I trust in my chair to not collapse because it's held me up thousands of times before. I have faith in my spouse and family to support me because they've been there for me in difficult times before. I don't have faith in my government to make good decisions for the betterment of my nation because they've shown themselves to be lily-livered and self serving.

It's easy to see how most theistic religions are faith based. Many have scriptures which tell a history of their god or gods being trustworthy. Many teach an ethical system which they believe is shown repeatedly to lead to human flourishing. Many encourage their people to share with their communities how their god or gods have supported them through difficult times. Religious people have faith when their past experience of the divine leads them to trust the divine for the future.

But it's also easy to see that many people with religious beliefs do not live faith-based lives. There are "Sunday" Christians, "Saturday" Jews, and "Friday" Muslims who attend their religious community's meeting but who live the rest of their week without their beliefs making a difference. And of course there are many people who might say they believe in God without ever attending a religious service! Many religious people do not trust their god or gods to help them in difficult times, and some may be convinced by certain apologetic arguments for the existence of the divine without having any personal experience of it. I even wonder if reincarnation may take the pressure off many Buddhist people to delve deeper into religious thought or to devote their life to carefully following their ethical principles because their belief in reincarnation means they will have unending lives to live more religiously in the future.

So theism is not necessarily faith based. But it is true that most of the world's religious do encourage faith-based living, and those who believe without it shaping the way they live are not considered good examples of their religions.

I think belief can be distinguished from faith. As I wrote in the parallel question on atheism, the essence of faith is a confidence or ability to trust in the present and future because of past reliability. I trust in my chair to not collapse because it's held me up thousands of times before. I have faith in my spouse and family to support me because they've been there for me in difficult times before. I don't have faith in my government to make good decisions for the betterment of my nation because they've shown themselves to be lily-livered and self serving.

It's easy to see how most theistic religions are faith based. Many have scriptures which tell a history of their god or gods being trustworthy. Many teach an ethical system which they believe is shown repeatedly to lead to human flourishing. Many encourage their people to share with their communities how their god or gods have supported them through difficult times. Religious people have faith when their past experience of the divine leads them to trust the divine for the future.

But it's also easy to see that many people with religious beliefs do not live faith-based lives. There are "Sunday" Christians, "Saturday" Jews, and "Friday" Muslims who attend their religious community's meeting but who live the rest of their week without their beliefs making a difference. And of course there are many people who might say they believe in God without ever attending a religious service! Many religious people do not trust their god or gods to help them in difficult times, and some may be convinced by certain apologetic arguments for the existence of the divine without having any personal experience of it. I even wonder if reincarnation may take the pressure off many Buddhist people to delve deeper into religious thought or to devote their life to carefully following their ethical principles because their belief in reincarnation means they will have unending lives to live more religiously in the future.

So theism is not necessarily faith based. But it is true that most of the world's religions do encourage faith-based living, and those who believe without it shaping the way they live are not considered good examples of their religions.

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I think belief can be distinguished from faith. As I wrote in the parallel question on atheism, the essence of faith is a confidence or ability to trust in the present and future because of past reliability. I trust in my chair to not collapse because it's held me up thousands of times before. I have faith in my spouse and family to support me because they've been there for me in difficult times before. I don't have faith in my government to make good decisions for the betterment of my nation because they've shown themselves to be lily-livered and self serving.

It's easy to see how most theistic religions are faith based. Many have scriptures which tell a history of their god or gods being trustworthy. Many teach an ethical system which they believe is shown repeatedly to lead to human flourishing. Many encourage their people to share with their communities how their god or gods have supported them through difficult times. Religious people have faith when their past experience of the divine leads them to trust the divine for the future.

But it's also easy to see that many people with religious beliefs do not live faith-based lives. There are "Sunday" Christians, "Saturday" Jews, and "Friday" Muslims who attend their religious community's meeting but who live the rest of their week without their beliefs making a difference. And of course there are many people who might say they believe in God without ever attending a religious service! Many religious people do not trust their god or gods to help them in difficult times, and some may be convinced by certain apologetic arguments for the existence of the divine without having any personal experience of it. I even wonder if reincarnation may take the pressure off many Buddhist people to delve deeper into religious thought or to devote their life to carefully following their ethical principles because their belief in reincarnation means they will have unending lives to live more religiously in the future.

So theism is not necessarily faith based. But it is true that most of the world's religious do encourage faith-based living, and those who believe without it shaping the way they live are not considered good examples of their religions.