Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
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Wikipedia gives this interpretation via Emma Goldman:

Nietzsche's memorable maxim, 'When you go to woman, take the whip along,' is considered very brutal, yet Nietzsche expressed in one sentence the attitude of woman towards her gods... Religion, especially the Christian religion, has condemned woman to the life of an inferior, a slave. It has thwarted her nature and fettered her soul, yet the Christian religion has no greater supporter, none more devout, than woman. Indeed, it is safe to say that religion would have long ceased to be a factor in the lives of the people, if it were not for the support it receives from woman. The most ardent churchworkers, the most tireless missionaries the world over, are women, always sacrificing on the altar of the gods that have chained her spirit and enslaved her body...

This seems to fit in with what would be my "instinctual" reading of the maxim, which I was tempted to expand upon in the comments -- that women are the uncomplaining victims of a kind of astonishing biological-cosmic-social conspiracy. The remark, strange as it sounds, is "pro-feminist" in the sense that, as D+G might put it, feminists can never take their "becoming-woman" far enough. I think we definitely miss the point if we reduce the insight here to the level of procreation-filiation, even at the asymptotic limit of giving birth to the "overman" -- here I am tempted to remind us of Derrida's remarks about mothers, especially about "thinking" mothers; he says they are something like the most important thing, the point of his work. This..

At any rate this seems to resonateme resonant with the sentiment I feel like Nietzsche might be articulating here;here. In terms of places to explore further I might suggest referring to Derrida's Spurs. (I also suspect Deleuze has mentioned this somewhere in; Deleuze's Nietzsche and Philosophy also might be particularly useful here.)

Wikipedia gives this interpretation via Emma Goldman:

Nietzsche's memorable maxim, 'When you go to woman, take the whip along,' is considered very brutal, yet Nietzsche expressed in one sentence the attitude of woman towards her gods... Religion, especially the Christian religion, has condemned woman to the life of an inferior, a slave. It has thwarted her nature and fettered her soul, yet the Christian religion has no greater supporter, none more devout, than woman. Indeed, it is safe to say that religion would have long ceased to be a factor in the lives of the people, if it were not for the support it receives from woman. The most ardent churchworkers, the most tireless missionaries the world over, are women, always sacrificing on the altar of the gods that have chained her spirit and enslaved her body...

This seems to fit in with what would be my "instinctual" reading of the maxim, which I was tempted to expand upon in the comments -- that women are the uncomplaining victims of a kind of astonishing biological-cosmic-social conspiracy. The remark, strange as it sounds, is "pro-feminist" in the sense that, as D+G might put it, feminists can never take their "becoming-woman" far enough. I think we definitely miss the point if we reduce the insight here to the level of procreation-filiation, even at the asymptotic limit of giving birth to the "overman" -- here I am tempted to remind us of Derrida's remarks about mothers, especially about "thinking" mothers; he says they are something like the most important thing, the point of his work. This seems to resonate with the sentiment I feel like Nietzsche might be articulating here; I might suggest referring to Derrida's Spurs. (I also suspect Deleuze has mentioned this somewhere in Nietzsche and Philosophy.)

Wikipedia gives this interpretation via Emma Goldman:

Nietzsche's memorable maxim, 'When you go to woman, take the whip along,' is considered very brutal, yet Nietzsche expressed in one sentence the attitude of woman towards her gods... Religion, especially the Christian religion, has condemned woman to the life of an inferior, a slave. It has thwarted her nature and fettered her soul, yet the Christian religion has no greater supporter, none more devout, than woman. Indeed, it is safe to say that religion would have long ceased to be a factor in the lives of the people, if it were not for the support it receives from woman. The most ardent churchworkers, the most tireless missionaries the world over, are women, always sacrificing on the altar of the gods that have chained her spirit and enslaved her body...

This seems to fit in with what would be my "instinctual" reading of the maxim, which I was tempted to expand upon in the comments -- that women are the uncomplaining victims of a kind of astonishing biological-cosmic-social conspiracy. The remark, strange as it sounds, is "pro-feminist" in the sense that, as D+G might put it, feminists can never take their "becoming-woman" far enough. I think we definitely miss the point if we reduce the insight here to the level of procreation-filiation, even at the asymptotic limit of giving birth to the "overman" -- here I am tempted to remind us of Derrida's remarks about mothers, especially about "thinking" mothers; he says they are something like the most important thing, the point of his work...

At any rate this seems to me resonant with the sentiment I feel like Nietzsche might be articulating here. In terms of places to explore further I might suggest referring to Derrida's Spurs; Deleuze's Nietzsche and Philosophy also might be particularly useful here.

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source | link

Wikipedia gives this interpretation via Emma Goldman:

Nietzsche's memorable maxim, 'When you go to woman, take the whip along,' is considered very brutal, yet Nietzsche expressed in one sentence the attitude of woman towards her gods... Religion, especially the Christian religion, has condemned woman to the life of an inferior, a slave. It has thwarted her nature and fettered her soul, yet the Christian religion has no greater supporter, none more devout, than woman. Indeed, it is safe to say that religion would have long ceased to be a factor in the lives of the people, if it were not for the support it receives from woman. The most ardent churchworkers, the most tireless missionaries the world over, are women, always sacrificing on the altar of the gods that have chained her spirit and enslaved her body...

This seems to fit in with what would be my "instinctual" reading of the maxim, which I was tempted to expand upon in the comments -- that women are the uncomplaining victims of a kind of astonishing biological-cosmic-social conspiracy. The remark, strange as it sounds, is "pro-feminist" in the sense that, as D+G might put it, feminists can never take their "becoming-woman" far enough. I think we definitely miss the point if we reduce the insight here to the level of procreation-filiation, even at the asymptotic limit of giving birth to the "overman" -- here I am tempted to remind us of Derrida's remarks about mothers, especially about "thinking" mothers; he says they are something like the most important thing, the point of his work. This seems to resonate with the sentiment I feel like Nietzsche might be articulating here; I might suggest referring to Derrida's Spurs. (I also suspect Deleuze has mentioned this somewhere in Nietzsche and Philosophy.)