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Basically, he used structuralist principles in two major ways:

  • To situate his subject of study (kinship, food preparation, myths, etc.) within a larger frame such as the group or the culture.
  • To establish dualities (binary oppositions) or other counter-balancing forces in the subject of study, along the lines of the distinctions made by Saussure when studying language (i.e. parole vs. langue).

For example, Lévi-Strauss proposed that myths must follow some kind of universal patterns, similar to archetypes if you wish; this makes myths from different cultures to be comparable, for instance. The Savage Mind and The Raw and the Cooked are two books by Lévi-Strauss where you can see the details of this.

Basically, he used structuralist principles in two major ways:

  • To situate his subject of study (kinship, food preparation, myths, etc.) within a larger frame such as the group or the culture.
  • To establish dualities or other counter-balancing forces in the subject of study, along the lines of the distinctions made by Saussure when studying language (i.e. parole vs. langue).

For example, Lévi-Strauss proposed that myths must follow some kind of universal patterns, similar to archetypes if you wish; this makes myths from different cultures to be comparable, for instance. The Savage Mind and The Raw and the Cooked are two books by Lévi-Strauss where you can see the details of this.

Basically, he used structuralist principles in two major ways:

  • To situate his subject of study (kinship, food preparation, myths, etc.) within a larger frame such as the group or the culture.
  • To establish dualities (binary oppositions) or other counter-balancing forces in the subject of study, along the lines of the distinctions made by Saussure when studying language (i.e. parole vs. langue).

For example, Lévi-Strauss proposed that myths must follow some kind of universal patterns, similar to archetypes if you wish; this makes myths from different cultures to be comparable, for instance. The Savage Mind and The Raw and the Cooked are two books by Lévi-Strauss where you can see the details of this.

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source | link

Basically, he used structuralist principles in two major ways:

  • To situate his subject of study (kinship, food preparation, myths, etc.) within a larger frame such as the group or the culture.
  • To establish dualities or other counter-balancing forces in the subject of study, along the lines of the distinctions made by Saussure when studying language (i.e. parole vs. langue).

For example, Lévi-Strauss proposed that myths must follow some kind of universal patterns, similar to archetypes if you wish; this makes myths from different cultures to be comparable, for instance. The Savage Mind and The Raw and the Cooked are two books by Lévi-Strauss where you can see the details of this.