0

God , soul can be considered noumena , existing as thing in itself ,and while what we perceive through six senses can be called phenomena.

However I can say that what we perceive through six senses is actually a thing in itself ,that is , a noumena and that God is the actual phenomena.

In other words , if God is not found in a phenomena then it is actually a noumena, a thing in itself.

Therefore , can I say that noumena and phenomena can possibly a relativistic concept , that is , it depends on who you ask , whether you ask a believer or a non-believer?

2
  • No. I mean relative to each other where each other can be understood as believer and non -believer. Nov 23, 2023 at 8:26
  • @MauroALLEGRANZA for example -relativistic nature of human experience. Nov 23, 2023 at 8:28

1 Answer 1

2

No, there is nothing relativistic in the definitions of noumena and phenomena. Phenomena are by definition the things as they appear to the senses. Calling these things noumena is not relative; it is a simple redefinition.

3
  • From believers point of view I can say the following- I see God everywhere(as my God is omnipresent) . For me God is the phenomena where as the subjective experience of senses are things in itself ,that is, a noumena!! But to understand me you have to become a believer. Nov 23, 2023 at 10:09
  • Do you claim to see God with your physical senses? If so, then the God that you see is a phenomenon, meaning that it is a part of the perceptible universe. I don't know your religion, but in Christian teaching, only Jesus, a single aspect of God is part of the perceptible universe, God as a whole is beyond perception. And your claim is contradictory. If God is phenomenal because you see him, then why are other things you see noumenal? Nov 23, 2023 at 10:31
  • From the point of view of believer : God is omnipresent. I see from the eye of believer, who sees God everywhere. Other things are noumenal because they exist without connection to my eye , touch , taste , smell and mind. Nov 23, 2023 at 13:23

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .