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The most common answer here will be: evil must be allowed to have free will. This is simply not true. If we are speaking of an omnipotent God that created the entire universe and any extra dimensional space we can't observe, then couldn't he have come up with something better?

If not, and the presence of horrible evils was the only way free will could exist, then why have horrible evils, which causes horrible things to happen to your people (eg: Babies being raped to death, mass genocide, beheadings, starvation etc.)?

Wouldn't a God that cared about his people realize that free will is not worth the mass destruction caused by the human race? Not to mention such atrocities as disease, which is not a necessary component for free will's existence, that also flourishes in this environment here on earth. What is its purpose? The questions asked here are rhetorical; the main question stands.

closed as off-topic by virmaior, Hunan Rostomyan, iphigenie, Lucas, Neil Meyer May 15 '14 at 16:00

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Why should one suppose that an omnipotent God necessarily has to be good? In the same way that a child might wish to build something up for the pleasure of breaking it, might it not be that God might have an interest in seeing such evils play out?

What if an omnipotent God were to exist beyond what we would consider the remits of good and evil? What if an enlightened curiosity were instead to be unfolding?

In fact, why should we not suppose that the universe is in fact one with such an omnipotent God? What if time and space were but of the fabric of God and that all sentient life forms are but vessels drifting through their short existences gathering the essence of experiences to once again become one with the Creator?

If this last possible interpretation were to be close to the truth then perhaps the answer simply comes down to 'experience'.


Of course an alternative interpretation more in line with traditional religious thoughts would be that these are tribulations and tests to serve the trial-by-fire of the individuals themselves and/ or the ones who care about them - and/ or even the perpetrators of evil acts.


Of course - pointing towards an omnipotent God for reasons why the mad gunman wasn't stopped from going upon his rampage is perhaps to shrug off the role that any individual might have had in seeing to it that such circumstances are prevented or eradicated in the name of good. Perhaps each disaster should be viewed as the tragic peak of an iceberg of incompetence and callousness. Perhaps humanity should play more of a hand in our own destiny.

  • That's exactly correct. If God does exist, then he is an evil entity without a doubt. – user3138766 May 15 '14 at 15:33
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    I don't know... a God would have to be pretty motivated to qualify as truly being evil :) Just as there may not be sufficient reason to paint God as being good, so too would there be insufficient reason to paint God as being evil. Perhaps within God one can find the entire spectrum of good and evil - in which case perhaps God could be described as being Spectral-Neutral - a sum of absolutes and all the shades in between. – Avestron May 15 '14 at 19:47
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Why did omnipotent Stalin (more 'in position of power' but let's play along) killed millions?
Why not?
You are doing good deeds not because you are born good, but because you have been taught by the surrounding world that it is in your best interest to behave.
You do not have power over others and your evil deeds eventually will backfire on you.
God and Stalin are not like you and cannot be punished, so why not?

  • Why not? Because it lays in your core top optimize, to grow. Being evil brings chaos which is the opposite of growing. Growing is by definition more structure, evil is behaving destructive and by definition causing more chaos. Eventually evil destructs itself, like apoptosis in a cancer cell. A cancer cell, if not killed by apoptosis, is finally killed when its hosts dies. So what is the point of self destruction? That is the reason why not. – Mike de Klerk May 16 '14 at 12:54
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    @MikedeKlerk so you are stating that god wants to grow and optimise and therefore he should be nice, because otherwise he will not grow if he's evil and destructive and will eventually self destruct? – Matas Vaitkevicius Jul 11 '14 at 14:01
  • Systems grow larger due to synergy created by its components See the organs in your body working together serving a greater purpose than they could by there selves. If all your organs, or cells in your body would become destructive, you would die. If all components of a system in general would loose there synergy, the system falls apart, as it existed on that synergy. So in essence my answer to your question is yes. – Mike de Klerk Jul 14 '14 at 7:12
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Don't anthropomorphize God. It doesn't have to necessarily be a being with feelings. It might just be a system that hosts beings to evolve, that have feelings. Flooding the earth in SimCity isn't horrible at all to the computer that causes the event.

  • Or for that matter the user that made the computer flood the city. How many entities have you kill in an fps without blinking an eye, after all. – lorentzfactor Jul 30 '15 at 4:37

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