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Leading on from this question here. I am trying to construct an understanding of why Husserl and Derrida in Aporias might believe in immortality (though perhaps neither do.)

Do any of the philosophers of "intervals" or "durations" (I am thinking of Irigaray and Bergson, respectively) suggest that their nature is such that we experience events in a flux of time but that those events never really end?

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    Can you rigorously define what it means to experience an interval? – lemon Aug 26 '14 at 17:11
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    Can you briefly explain what you mean? Perhaps articulating your thoughts more clearly would be more productive than wishing you could downvote those who didn't understand what you meant. – user4894 Aug 27 '14 at 17:35
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    I Googled and found "Interval, Sexual Difference: Luce Irigaray and Henri Bergson." The abstract says: Drawing on Luce Irigaray's well-known critical description of metaphysics as phallocentrism, Hill argues that Bergson's deduction of duration is predicated upon the disavowal of a sexed hierarchy. She concludes the article by proposing a way to move beyond Bergson's phallocentrism to articulate duration as a sensible and transcendental difference that articulates a nonhierarchical qualitative relation between the sexes. Can you frame your question in this context? – user4894 Aug 29 '14 at 5:19
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    I find the question a little confusing; wikipedia mentions that aporia in post-structuralist thought of Derrida & Irigray; but offers no detail; they're also continental thinkers; whereas your later mention of 'A & B-series' relates to the idealist philosophers McTaggarts thinking on time, which on the face of it is more aligned with analytical thought; perhaps you could expand your question to provide more detail on Derridas/Irigrays position and how it possibly relates to McTaggarts thinking? – Mozibur Ullah Aug 30 '14 at 13:55
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    This would make it more likely that your question will get more attention and a good quality answer; also the headline question could do with some attention - as it looking for a physical/mathematical answer; ie limits make me think of calculus; perhaps you could drop in a name like Bergson to clue in people its not about science per se. – Mozibur Ullah Aug 30 '14 at 13:56
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I'm apparently not seeing what a "duration" or "interval" is supposed to be such that the answer to this question isn't just obviously Yes. Here's an interval of time: 24 hours. The interval begins when I start the clock running at 12pm Monday, and that interval ends at 12pm Tuesday. It's no good to say "well that's just clock time, not lived, phenomenological time" or something like that, because I experience things beginning and ending and time elapsing in between.

I think that question about immortality is confused. Here's a claim that might be true: I don't experience the end of my life, because by the time my life ends, I'm no longer there to be the subject of that experience. That's an epistemological claim about what kinds of things I can experience happening to me. "I cannot die" is an ontological claim that is not about the limits of my experience. The epistemological claim might be true (although I have my doubts), but the ontological one is clearly false.

  • i see what you mean... but i did say "those events never really end". – user6917 Aug 30 '14 at 19:35
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    Can you give an example of an event that doesn't end? – shane Aug 30 '14 at 19:36
  • i said never really end – user6917 Aug 30 '14 at 19:38
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    What's the difference between ending and "really ending"? Are there clear cases of an experience of something that ends, but not really? That sounds absurd. These two sentences: l2+2=4" and "no guys, 2+2=4 for real." seem to express the exact same thought to me. "Really" does add anything. – shane Aug 30 '14 at 19:42
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    Haven't the foggiest. But if they disagree with me, they're wrong. Now maybe they mean something entirely different by "interval" or whatever. Maybe it's some quite different concept that some philosopher has assigned a technical meaning. But it can't be something like the ordinary sense, I've been outlining above. – shane Aug 30 '14 at 20:02

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