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Is there any published research which attempts to establish a possible link between extreme patriotism and institutionalized racism? What do they conclude?

closed as not constructive by Joseph Weissman Jan 17 '13 at 15:38

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    You're going to have to expand on this a bit. I'm not sure many people will just leap to the conclusion you've made without some explanation... – stoicfury Dec 8 '11 at 1:58
  • Great questions ask about one specific thing; it would be good if you could focus in a bit more closely on the problem you're facing in your study of philosophy. Is there any way I might encourage you to develop this a little bit more? Can you perhaps tell us a bit about your context and motivations, and maybe a little bit more about where you might be coming from here? What might you be reading that made this an important or urgent theoretical concern? What might you have found out so far? – Joseph Weissman Dec 8 '11 at 3:04
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    @YUASK: Here's some constructive criticism, then. This site is a Q&A site for asking questions about philosophy, not for asking philosophical questions. So, if you are doing some research on patriotism and racism in a particular philosophical tradition, and have a question about what you are reading, that question would be welcomed and upvoted. A question asking us to philosophize, on the other hand, such as a question asking our collective opinions about the relationship between patriotism and racism, is likely to be downvoted or closed. – Michael Dorfman Dec 8 '11 at 8:10
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    The text on the "close" message is quite clear about this: We expect answers to generally involve facts, references, or specific expertise; this question will likely solicit opinion, debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion – Michael Dorfman Dec 8 '11 at 8:11
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    @YUASK: You are free to edit your questions at any time, even closed ones. If you address the problems of a closed question, it will be reopened. – stoicfury Dec 9 '11 at 1:12
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While there are not any studies, at least that I know of, that directly link extreme patriotism and institutionalized racism there are multiple studies which links conservatism to patriotism/loyalty towards the in-group and a higher dislike and distrust of out-groups. We could then deduct, but not with any certainty, that racism stems from a dislike and distrust of out-groups.

I would be very cautious though when talking about this because a dislike or distrust of an out-group A) Does not directly relate to racism B) Has shown to have genetic reasons as to why an in-group would dislike or distrust an out-group.

With that said the link below goes to a study that shows how people who are conservative are more loyal and in-group based. http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=89be3139-cbd6-4c9d-8137-faa4696592e6%40sessionmgr14&vid=1&hid=15&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZSZzY29wZT1zaXRl#db=pdh&AN=psp-96-5-1029

This link goes to a study that explains why certain in-groups would have a distrust of out-groups. The intention of this study is to show how living conditions may have genetically effected humans into having a distrust or dislike of an out-group but within the study it states how conservatives are more likely to have these feelings. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-185X.2008.00062.x/full

The logic behind this would be that from an evolutionary standpoint it was beneficial at times to be distrusting of out-groups. Because genes do not simply disappear but tend to linger this distrust still remains while the reasons for the distrust may still not be there. This answer may be more biological based then you hoped but it is a possible answer but should definitely not be interpreted as a fact or truth, it is solely a possible explanation.

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