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Arguments can be won by utilizing a mixture of ethos, pathos, and logos. Logos may either appeal using real logic (facts), or using deceptive logic (non-facts).

What's the term for deceiving people using a combination of pathos and non-factual logos, giving an appearance of solidity to pure wind and making murders respectable?

What's the term for gaining the upper hand by elegantly deceptive manipulations of words and emotions instead of by actual facts and real logic?

  • bad rhetoric i dunno have you used a faulty premise, that logos is only fact based? i'm not sure everyone would agree with that anyway, fact is a strong word we may want to reserve for what is objective or verifiable in some particular way – user6917 Dec 21 '14 at 21:10
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    Plato called people who use rethoric / philosophy to persuade people sophists. – yamm Dec 22 '14 at 8:53
  • I was about to try to suggest an edit here to try to frame it in somewhat more clear language -- something like "Is there a term for winning an argument by appealing to the hearer's emotions?" --But at any rate: could you try to specify what exactly is the problem that you are encountering in your study of philosophy? What precisely is it that you would like someone here to explain to you? – Joseph Weissman Dec 23 '14 at 19:54
  • @JosephWeissman, I'm learning terminologies. Looking for a term. For example, appealing to the audience’s emotions would be called "pathos", appealing to authority would be called "ethos", appealing to simulation of logic would be called "logos". What's the term for deceiving people using a combination of pathos and non-factual logos, giving an appearance of solidity to pure wind and making murders respectable? – Pacerier Dec 23 '14 at 20:12
  • @YannikAmmann has it. The word is 'sophistry': the triumph of rhetoric over logic. – jobermark Dec 23 '14 at 20:38
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As has been pointed out in the comments, the closest correct answer to this question that I'm aware of is "sophistry".

That is, there is no term to my knowledge that is specifically about winning an argument using elegant/deceptive manipulation, but the act itself is known as sophistry. The people who do this are known as sophists.

Being called a sophist wasn't always meant in a negative way, and indeed the original terms referred to people who were simply well-spoken. The word actually comes from Greek σόφισμα, sophisma, from σοφίζω, sophizo "I am wise"[2], but this changed over time.

Owing largely to the influence of Plato and Aristotle, philosophy came to be regarded as distinct from sophistry, the latter being regarded as specious and rhetorical, a practical discipline. Thus, by the time of the Roman Empire, a sophist was simply a teacher of rhetoric and a popular public speaker. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophism

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