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Once the contemplative life Aristotle posits is best is attained do the cardinal virtues of Courage, Wisdom, Temperance, and Justice attain a second order of completeness based on the predominance of the cognitive aspect? For example, one could posit that Courage is good, but contemplating the experience of having taken courageous actions is more accurately described as compassionate. For example, one could posit Justice is good, but contemplating the experience of doing just actions, or being the victim of injustice or having benefited from a dispensation of justice is better called Beatitude than Justice. For example, Temperance is the enjoyment of only appropriate pleasure, but if an appropriate amount of satisfaction is monumental in nature and is able to be recollected, then the experience of drawing on that source is possibly the salient aspect of charisma. Finally, if wisdom is complete in contemplation, is not the experience of gaining additional facts and details more like an appetite, vis a vis, what it means to be curious. Where can I find a discourse similar to the one above somewhere else in philosophy?

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Below are the oxford dictionary definitions of each of the qualities posited as second order virtues, which vindicate our theory in the case of compassion, beatitude, and curiosity. The case for charisma is more difficult:

Definition of compassion in English:

NOUN [MASS NOUN] Sympathetic pity and concern for the sufferings or misfortunes of others: the victims should be treated with compassion He had no pity, no compassion, no understanding of what the victims of war suffered. However, lofty doctors who show no warmth, compassion or concern are becoming rare. We missed the feeding, thanks to me and my friends' compassion for my emotions.

Definition of beatitude in English:

NOUN [MASS NOUN] 1Supreme blessedness: the expression of beatitude the religious sometimes adopt MORE EXAMPLE SENTENCES Meditation is the science of bringing inner beauty, inner beatitude, inner benediction. The phrase was on the cover of a Christian magazine which showed an awkward-looking teen sat in a chair being hugged by his parents who had expressions of moronic beatitude. The terrifying aspect of this Self makes Arjuna shudder with fear, and hence the Lord also reveals His most beautiful form that is full of bliss, beatitude, and serenity.

Definition of charisma in English: NOUN

1 [MASS NOUN] Compelling attractiveness or charm that can inspire devotion in others: he has tremendous charisma and stage presence MORE EXAMPLE SENTENCES Your personal charm and charisma take you through difficult situations smoothly. I think he has charisma, but it's not the sort of charisma that attracts the ordinary voter. I'm fascinated by this character trait known as charm or charisma.

Definition of curiosity in English: NOUN (plural curiosities)

1 [MASS NOUN] A strong desire to know or learn something: filled with curiosity, she peered through the window curiosity got the better of me, so I called him MORE EXAMPLE SENTENCES And I am consumed by curiosity and a desire to know what on earth this cool thing is going to be like. In his essay on Leonardo, Freud even derives curiosity and the desire for knowledge from sexuality. The latter is a moralistic bore who puts intellectual curiosity second to her desire to pontificate.

  • I'm not at all following how this series of definitions addresses the question... – virmaior Jan 27 '15 at 8:58
  • LOL @ irony. Branden is my friend and posted this on my account. So it's both him so far. He is fractile like. – Sidhartha Jan 27 '15 at 10:29
  • My God Richard. You did not read that copy of the Art of War I pushed in your face I think. Anyhow, the question was, where can I find another similar discourse, and of course the dictionary is a sort of technology that delivers philosophy, so I went there, as a first step. I am still very curious as to where I could locate something similar in nature in the works of a recognized academic past or present. – Branden Rennie Jan 27 '15 at 14:08

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