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I am writing an essay and I mentioned how I had a love of philosophy from a young age this is what I said:

As I got older it became more complex and was Metaphysics based. When I was 10 I came up with a paradox, translating from 10 year old language it was “If time had a beginning, how did it ever start? If time is infinite, why didn’t this present moment occur an infinite ago?

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    Hi. The question's title does not fit the question's body. It isn't clear what you are asking. Commented Jan 29, 2015 at 18:20
  • Do not answer in comments. If you've got an answer, it goes in an answer.
    – Joseph Weissman
    Commented Jan 30, 2015 at 2:38

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Yes, the study of time falls within metaphysics, since philosophers use that word to describe the study of the nature of reality.

However, because physicists have significantly developed their views about the nature of time over the course of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, most philosophical discussion of time is now deeply engaged with current physical theories. Therefore, much of the philosophical discussion of time is currently being done by philosophers who identify themselves as philosophers of science working on physics.

One might therefore say that the nature of time is a question in physics, metaphysics, and philosophy of science.

You might find it useful to look through the entry on Time in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

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This does not directly answer your question, but seems to me so important that I thought I'd be better here than as a comment.

You can say whatever you want about time (or anything else) as long as you did not give any definition of it. Understand, or pretending/believing to understand (how can you be sure) the nature of something which has not been defined probably enters in the scope of metaphysics.

To be a bit more constructive, the only definition I read of time was something like: "There has been time iff two observations are different". That implies that time requires observations, which may seem weird... but, think about it. This definition corresponds to the concept of time which is usually used in everyday life, in physics, etc. Speaking about the infinity of time, irreversibility of time etc. without defining it is, in my opinion, loss of time (or worse).

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