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I have read such a passage in Nicomachean Ethics :

Such a life would be too high for man; for it is not in so far as he is man that he will live so, but in so far as something divine is present in him; and by so much as this is superior to our composite nature is its activity superior to that which is the exercise of the other kind of virtue

What does Aristotle mean by 'for it is not in so far as he is man that he will live so'?

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It appears Aristotle is saying such a life would be too ascetic and unnaturally austere. Quoting Nicomachean Ethics, Chapter 7 (link) :

"... but the activity of reason, which is contemplative, seems both to be superior in serious worth and to aim at no end beyond itself, and to have its pleasure proper to itself ..., it follows that this will be the complete happiness of man, ... But such a life would be too high for man; for it is not in so far as he is man that he will live so, ...

Nevertheless, this is part of the aim of Buddhist philosophy, except that one who has fully 'gone-beyond' (an Arahant), would aim for "conscious entry into the gradually obtained complete cessation of notion"; that is, cessation from the activity of reasoning. Pure contemplation, if you like.

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