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Let's say there's the claim:

There is a place that men are forbidden to enter.

I think we are allowed to say that ginger-haired men mustn't enter there. But are we allowed to say that there is a ban on ginger-haired men?

Another example:

let's say pedestrians aren't allowed to walk on a highway.

I think we are allowed to say that one cannot hitchhike on that highway. But are we allowed to say that there is a ban on hitchhiking on that highway?

When making an argument, should I leave the implication that hitchhiking involves walking as an exercise for my reader or should I spell it out?

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According to Grice's maxims, you should be as informative as you can. Thus, saying "there is a ban on ginger-haired men" is wrong, because it informally implies "There is a rule that, from which it not only follows that, ginger-haired men are not allowed".

Grice's maxims are rules given by the area of informal logic. Since both formal and informal logic matter within communication, even if "A" and "A -> B", saying "B" might be wrong.

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    You understood my question perfectly. Thank you. – Anonymouse Jul 27 '15 at 1:44
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In the English language, when we say "there is a ban on X", it doesn't just mean that there is a rule, and as a consequence of that rule X is not allowed, but it means there is a rule that explicitly forbids X. Which means that when we hear this sentence, we don't expect things that are similar but different from X to be disallowed.

If you say "there is a ban on ginger-haired men", we expect that there is no ban on blonde men, black-haired men, bald men, or women, whether ginger-haired or not. That expectation makes your statement truthful, but misleading.

Are you allowed to make misleading statements? If you talk about laws, not if you do it for fraud. If you talk about ethics, no. (If I asked you "Can I enter this place", you said "there is a ban on ginger-haired men" and I made a journey to the place only to be refused entry, I would be quite angry with you). If you talk about being taken serious in future discussions, people will not consider you trustworthy if you make that kind of statement.

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Anonymouse said:

Another example:

let's say pedestrians aren't allowed to walk on a highway.

I think we are allowed to say that one cannot hitchhike on that highway. But are we allowed to say that there is a ban on hitchhiking on that highway?

As long as you are asking about clarity which of the following is your intent:

  • (A) "one can not hitchhike" -- (physical incapacity)

or

  • (B) "one may not hitchhike" -- (denied authority)

?

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