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I know that co-constructivism is a branch of Social Constructivism, but what is it exactly?

I've been told that Co-constructivism is very similar to Soft Technological Determinism, however I don't understand what Co-Constructivism is or how it differs from Soft Technological Determinism.

My understanding of Soft Technological Determinism is:

Technology is the driving force that influences society, but society can make choices and influence technology in its early stages of acceptance.

Example: we need a cell phone to be relevant in the world today, but back when cell phones were first accepted we could have influenced what cell phones would eventually have become.

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    Can you give a citation of someone using the term "co-constructivism" and why it's material to show it is different than soft technological determinism? – virmaior Oct 20 '15 at 4:32
  • btw steve, i can't see many google hits of both terms, so do you just want a definition of co-constructivism? technological determinism seems like a philosophical term, and the former a psychological one. there may be too much baggage to answer the question, but who knows right – user6917 Oct 20 '15 at 5:01
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    Sure, a definition of co-constructivism would help. A comparison of co-constructivism and soft technological determinism would help as well. Thanks. – stevetronix Oct 20 '15 at 5:10
  • maybe whoever said this to you means that the co- and the soft - are similar, they both add another social dimesnion to "understanding", just a thought – user6917 Oct 20 '15 at 5:33
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Co-constructivism is the notion that society can influence technology at any time, not just at the beginning of a technology's initiation into society, as the Technological Momentum theory states.

The Technological Momentum theory states that a technology can be influenced by society only at the beginning of its initiation into society. As that technology gains momentum in society and is increasingly accepted, it is then impossible for society to influence that technology.

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