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We know that we can see distant galaxies only billions years before now. We can observe the nearest stars just several years before the present. Something on the Moon can be observed only some seconds in the past.

Continuing this scale, is there an object in the universe that can be observed just now, at present, or at least closer to the present than any other object?

I suppose such object should be located in the brain of the observer, but where in the brain exactly, given that brain has finite dementions.

The question can be formulated differently: where exactly is located the center of the sphere of the cosmological event horizon for a given observer?

closed as off-topic by Joseph Weissman Jan 7 '16 at 18:27

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    This is a physics question. An easy one--but it doesn't really belong here. Note that in the amount of time that a neuron can fire a single spike (~1 ms; your brain can't do anything without spikes transmitting information), light travels 300 km. Unless you're thinking not about humans but an extraordinarily rapid sensor (e.g. avalanche photodiode), delays from the finite speed of light are completely insignficant compared to the delays in processing sensory information. You are a slow observer; everything you perceive is a fraction of a second in the past! – Rex Kerr Jun 3 '12 at 10:11
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    In physics site I was sent here. – Anixx Jun 3 '12 at 16:12
  • So you claim that nothing can be observed at present? – Anixx Jun 3 '12 at 16:13
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    Maybe this is actually a biology question--your "present" is actually a loose confederation of disjointly-timed signals coming in from your visual, auditory, tactile, and other sensory systems. You cleverly fuse these into a coherent percept, but there are innumerable illusions that break the fusion. For example, if you have one dot going in a circle and a second dot flashing when the first, say, passes 12 o'clock, you will see that the first dot was past 12 o'clock when the second flashed (even though they actually were simultaneous). There is no instant that is the present! – Rex Kerr Jun 3 '12 at 17:07
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    I claim that you need to stop thinking about "observation" and start thinking about physical interactions of fundamental particles (and information processing in the brain) to say anything remotely useful regarding "the present" on timescales under a second or so. Human reaction times can get down to about 200 milliseconds under ideal conditions; I suppose you could consider that as close to the present as we can get. (But we can time things far better than that if we're allowed to predict.) – Rex Kerr Jun 3 '12 at 20:28
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We know that we can see distant galaxies only billions years before now.

That's not really true. We are seeing them in the present; the light emitted from them left billions of years before now.

I suppose such object should be located in the brain of the observer, but where in the brain exactly, given that brain has finite dementions.

The brain has finite dimensions, but more relevantly, the brain has a finite perceptual sensitivity which is far smaller than the speed of light across an object the size of the brain.

The question can be formulated differently: where exactly is located the center of the sphere of the cosmological event horizon for a given observer?

To attempt to locate this more precisely than "the brain" is missing the point. In fact, I'd suggest "the mind".

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