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Given the following assumptions:

1) When Wittgenstein speaks about meaningful propositions he does refer to propositions of natural sciences.

2) About the problem of the perfection of language, he believes that at least a part of ordinary language is already perfectly ordered, as well as propositions of logic, if we refer to that part which has been purified from methaphisical assumptions and other nonsensical propositions.

I want to ask->

Are propositions of natural sciences to be considered propositions of natural language?

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Are propositions of natural sciences to be considered propositions of natural language?

Yes, they are; they can be "symbolized" and quite often propositions of natural science are expressed using mathematical symbolism.

But we have to remind that for W the opposition is not between natural science and logic as two different "domains" of knowledge.

Logic is not a body of truths, but only the "showing" of logical form.

Thus, we have always natural language; but different "contexts" can have different levels of "perfection", i.e. the thoughts expressed by scientific propositions must be more clear and with "sharper boundaries" (4.112) then plain language.

The elucidating role of philosophy must applyies also to science:

4.116 Everything that can be thought at all can be thought clearly. Everything that can be put into words can be put clearly.

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