2

where can I find an English translation of this book? Also, in it he talks about 12 pairs of term categories. which are really 21 (9 actual pairs and 3 "double sided" categories):
he writes - De Termino Simplici & ejus distributione in species
genus
species
causa
causatum
subjectum
adjunctum
totum
pars
notatio
notatum
conjugatio
conjugatum
definitio
definitum
divisio
divisum
comparata
diversa
opposita
testimonio
restestata
Where does he get that from? TIA.

  • 1
    As being a theologist who has learned in Heidelberg, I would guess that they are classical Scholastic categories of whom he does not think they have to be further discussed, like Kant did with his table of judgements in his CPR. But I am not deep into Scholastic logics at all, so that I cannot answer the question properly. – Philip Klöcking May 2 '16 at 13:28
4

It seems that the list of categories from Marcus Friedrich Wendelin's book: Logicae institutiones (1654) [see page 14-on] comes from Petrus Ramus's Dialectique (1955).

See also: Walter J. Ong, Ramus, Method, and the Decay of Dialogue: From the Art of Discourse to the Art of Reason (1958), page 183.

See also: William & Martha Kneale, The Development of Logic (1962), page 303.

In turn, Ramus derives them from Rudolph Agricola (and not Agrippa; see Kneale, page 303) influentia: De Inventione Dialectica libri tres (1479).

  • Deleted my answer because this one is clearly better. It appears that W is working with the humanist tradition more than traditional scholastic logic. – shane May 2 '16 at 15:24
  • @shane - Markus Friedrich Wendelin was a German reformed theologian active at Heidelberg (first half 1600s); the reformed logical tradition was a mix of Ramus and Melanchton (see: De dialecta libri iv (1528). Also influential: Jungius's textbook Logica Hamburgensis (1635). – Mauro ALLEGRANZA May 2 '16 at 15:32
  • 1
    And so I stand corrected ;) But it's good to see my intuition that you would probably be able to answer this question be confirmed., +1 – Philip Klöcking May 2 '16 at 15:43

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