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People always say things like, "The truth will set you free." Why does the truth matter though? After all, it's very clear that humans are pleasure seeking creatures. Human create self-fulfilling prophecies and believe what makes them happy; reject or stay away from unpleasant things of all sorts; and choose to believe or suppose "half-truths" or the like. Even if someone is a masochist and enjoys pain -- or if someone is suicidal and depressed and wants to end their lives -- we can agree, at least in this context, that the end result is based on an inherent desire and choice one made, which ultimately was driven by the same primal or biological/instinctive need that results in some form of ego-driven action.

People may very well agree with some "truths" that conform to whatever society, culture or beliefs they hold, whether they be true or "truths" at large. Given that anyone can believe in the "truth" -- whatever that means of how you wish to define it -- why would it matter if it was believed or not?

There's no evidence that rejecting the truth is "bad" other than what a society will label as being in denial or delusional. The reality is, accepting a truth or not doesn't change the fact that any truth is, in technicality, no different than something or someone being false. If truth and false are just a binary mask for "good" and "bad," would we not agree that their only purpose is to separate our beliefs of "good" from "bad" by calling "truthhood" the good thing and "falsehood" the bad, whatever that means?

It seems like people want such a logical sense to be applied to these subjective labels. For example, people associate truth with what they believe is true. People believe what's true based on what they are taught or choose to believe is true. No truth or false statement has always been set in stone, just as no good action nor bad action was always inherently justified or accepted/unaccepted throughout the centuries. Again, it would appear that people mask truth and false with "good" and "bad." Court and judicial systems often demand people make the truth when held under oath/etc. People have long associated falsehood with "bad."

In reality, overall, why does truth matter? Just because people say it's good? That's all? So truth and false notions are just masks for a broader sense of ethics and morality -- not provably factual or real?

closed as off-topic by Joseph Weissman May 21 '17 at 14:14

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions that push a personal philosophy with no question beyond "am I right" or "what do you think" are off-topic here as this is not a blog. It's ok to express unique opinions, but you must have an actual, answerable question to go with them." – Joseph Weissman
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    "There's no evidence that rejecting the truth is 'bad' other than what a society will label as being in denial or delusional. The reality is, accepting a truth or not doesn't change the fact that any truth is, in technicality, no different than something or someone being false." How do you justify this assertion? What are you basing the claim that there is no evidence of this on and on what are you basing the judgement that there is no difference between truth and falsity? The second sentence, in a literal sense, contradicts itself. – Not_Here May 21 '17 at 6:25
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    It seems like you have a very personal view of what truth is and how people apply the idea of truth to every day situations. For an introduction to the philosophical study of truth see this. You'll find that none of these definitions have anything to do with the concepts of 'good' or 'bad' and that none of them suggest we conflate the four words, leading to a rejection of the premises you are asserting in your question. – Not_Here May 21 '17 at 6:34
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    Do you realize how many truths you need to know just to get to work/school in the morning? Think about what your day would look like if all your beliefs were false. That's one reason why truth matters. – Eliran May 21 '17 at 7:20
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    A lot of this material seems more appropriate for an answer -- maybe consider simplifying the presentation, sharpening/narrowing the problem statement, and moving some of this down into an answer? (Note there's no problem with answering your own question -- but questions really should be as narrow and neutrally-framed as possible, with something like "one correct answer") – Joseph Weissman May 21 '17 at 14:15
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    This is maybe asked too broadly. One would have to beat about the neighboring dense bushes to answer it, e.g. you have to presume a view about truth since some of them will not grant truth much (ethical) value, redundancy theories might be examples of this, and some theories will grant truth only instrumental value, e.g. pragmatist theories. And to explain how truth might have intrinsic value you might have to discuss theories about happiness etc. See "True to Life Why Truth Matters" for one book length study:mitpress.mit.edu/books/true-life. But already Plato gave the issue attention – Johannes May 21 '17 at 18:49