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If someone you got to know who always has been polite to you tells you honestly that he likes you, is it morally wrong to tell him that you don't want to spend time with him?

On one hand, one could say that you personally can't control which people you like or feel interested about, and therefore this is not morally wrong. On the other hand, people who get the rejection in this situation, might feel to be treated unfair. Also, one could expect openness about every human being, because in some sense, everyone is special.

closed as primarily opinion-based by user19563, Swami Vishwananda, Nick R, Keelan Jun 6 '17 at 12:41

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Hi and welcome to Philosophy.SE. This strikes me as a personal belief issue, that is really dependent on opinion. Unfortunately, this is not the correct forum to ask this question. - To your question, my personal belief is that there is no reason to burn a bridge, but that doesn't mean you have to be more engaging than you want to. The fact that you posted this question speaks to your interest to reflect on what is the right thing to do, so trust your instincts. – PV22 May 31 '17 at 16:14
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    "He likes you" with the implication of spending time together might be an offer of more than friendship. Even if taken at face value maintaining false pretenses is generally considered unethical, so some form of declining is called for. Most people get the message from several specific offers to spend time together declined, without a general rejection speech. It only becomes necessary if the person is insensitive, and even then tact is needed to avoid hurting their feelings more than necessary. – Conifold May 31 '17 at 23:19
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I think to deny friendship with nice people is not regarding to morality. may be ignoring someone`s honest effort could be.

if someone if interested in you for friendship and being nice to you than you can give them reason that how are your perspectives are different so your friendship is not could be possible. so in this case you are not ignoring or disrespecting anyone you are just expressing your thoughts so there is nothing wrong on moral basis. but if you are abusing and disrespecting and arrogantly shouting or badly behave with person than it will be wrong on moral basis.

for me if you doing something to someone that will feel bad if that same someone will do to you than it is wrong. and otherwise there is no issue with morality. Is it morally wrong to deny friendship with nice people? answer is depends how (by what kind of behavior ) you deny it.

hope that helps.

  • Thanks. What could be acceptable reasons to not be friends? – user27076 May 31 '17 at 18:54
  • well, there are no any standard i would say any reason should not consider as unacceptable since everyone has own choice but yeah i mean i could just say that if you don't want to spoil your reputation than reason don't sound like narrow minded production like looks ugly or from different race or color etc.. – Nisarg Desai Jun 1 '17 at 5:37

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