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In response to "Why do we continue living?"

I've come across the idea that we hold nothingness to be uneventful, how we believe it to be consistent, to be "nothing" at all instances of time, or thus exempt from time.

Can a rational answer be:

"I continue to live because I can always die, but not always live?"

And furthermore is this an idea to be subconsciously realized?

I reopened this question as I want this from an indifferent perspective,with regard to apathy towards both subjects, life and death.

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"I continue to live because I can always die, but not always live" in and of itself doesn't answer the question, but it implies an answer: "I continue to live because I am unsure if I will get to live again once I die." Most people would sum this up as "I continue to live because I'm afraid to die."

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    Not necessarily afraid. It's just smarter. I have more choices while alive, so if choices matter, I should probably stay alive where possible. – Ask About Monica Jan 23 '18 at 21:44
  • @kbelder Well said, I fully agree. – I wrestled a bear once. Jan 23 '18 at 21:55
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"I continue to live because I can always die, but not always live"

Some people claim we never die; that we have eternal souls. Some people claim that we can be born again and/or live multiple lives. Usually these claims involve some catch of living correctly. From a scientific standpoint at this time it would seem the human body lives, once for a finite period of time. Before, and after this, would presumably be an infinite amount of non-life. So I would say choosing to live is rational.

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