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Good Day, how are you?

Today I want to ask about philosophical ideologies or movements that can help me understand what is happening behind a character that I want to analyze.

First a bit of character context.

Aysel (real name) is a Mexican werewolf; She was born as a lycan and has lived her life knowing that it is neither human nor animal, from the age of 13 has been able to transform into a wolf and a wolf-woman, without having to depend on the full moon.

All a classic Lycan character ... until 2 weeks ago when I asked his family a question in a session "Ask the characters what you want (͡ ° ͜ʖ ͡ °)".

This was my question:

How do you feel knowing that there is a monster inside you? I know that they try to be good parents and good students etc.

But you are a danger for everyone, one day you will lower your guard and the wolf will try to take over everything you are, your mind will scream for violence and blood, What does it feel to know that they are something that will never belong totally to something human or Something animal? PS What would you do if suddenly there was a cure for lycantropia ?, Would you use it or be a lycan and live with your family so important that you can never leave one?

To my surprise the younger sister replied first:

She talks about that werewolves are not a danger, they only defend themselves as wolves when they are threatened, and that although they have already made her feel like a monster, even the lycan have dreams and goals and beings that love them . She would never leave her family. She is proud of what she is.

And I could see a bit of Humanism VS Post-Humanism and something of Transhumanism. Also the eternal struggle between what it means to be human and what a being that is not human or animal represents; Also in my last analysis I also mention Sloterdijk of the post-humanist movement.

But then I received the answer from the middle sister:

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*An image where she is seen that her parents tell her that she is not like other humans and that they should hide it and she must accept what is, but despite this, her mind breaks and she cries disconsolate.

When her parents beg her to accept what she is, she screams that she can not.

All this while remembering the comments of humans who tell her that he behaves weird and she is too strange to fit with them.*

And now it's not just about distinguishing between the human and the nonhuman, but for something else, but I can not seem understand that ...

**Is there any school of philosophy for this?

Is this something dualistic?

Should I look for more in the traumas that people with post-traumatic syndrome experience?**


Buen día, que tal? El día de hoy quiero preguntar acerca de ideologías o movimientos philosoficos que puedan ayudarme a entender lo que ocurre detrás de un personaje que quiero analizar.

Primero un poco de Contexto del personaje.

Aysel (nombre real) es una mujer lobo mexicana; Ella nació como una lycan y ha vivido su vida sabiendo que no es algo ni humano ni animal, desde los 13 años ha podido transformarse en una loba y una mujer-loba, sin tener que depender de la luna llena.

Como es normal esto le repercutió mucho en su psyche y en su vida como adolescente.

A ella le molestan los ruidos altos y los malos olores, puede escuchar cosas que otros no pueden y su temperamento es explosivo, pero a pesar de todo ella ha sabido tener una vida más o menos normal. Todo un personaje Lycan clásico… hasta hace 2 semanas que hice una pregunta a su familia en una sesión de “Pregúntale a los personajes lo que quieras ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)” . Esta fue mi pregunta:

¿Cómo se sienten al saber que existe un monstruo dentro de ustedes? Sé que intentan ser buenos padres y buenos alumnos etc. Pero son un peligro andante para todos, un día bajaran la guardia y el lobo tratara de apoderarse de todo lo que son, su mente gritara por violencia y sangre, ¿Qué se siente saber que son algo que no pertenecerá jamás a totalmente a algo humano o a algo animal?, ¿Qué se siente ser un peligro caminante?

PD ¿Qué harían si de repente existiera una cura para la lycantropia?, ¿La usarían o es ser un lycan y vivir con su familia tan importante que no pueden dejar a ninguno jamás?

Para mi sorpresa la hermana menor respondió primero:

Una imagen donde ella habla de que los hombres-lobo no son un peligro, solo se defienden como los lobos cuando estos están amenazados, y que apesar de que ya la han echo sentir como un monstruo, incluso los lycan tiene sueños y metas y seres que los aman.

Y pude ver un poco de Humanismo VS Post-Humanismo y algo de Transhumanismo. También la eterna lucha entre lo que significa ser humano y lo que un ser que no es humano o animal representa; También en mi análisis pasado mencione también a Sloterdijk del movimiento post-humanista.

Pero después recibí la respuesta de la hermana del medio:

Una imagen donde se le ve que sus padres le dicen que no es como los demás humanos y que deben ocultarlo y ella debe aceptar lo que es, pero a pesar de esto su mente se rompe y ella llora desconsolada al momento de que le piden que acepte lo que es…ella solo responde que no puede.

Y ya no se trata solo de distinguir entre lo humano y lo no humano, si no de algo mas, pero no puedo entender que…

**¿Existe alguna escuela de filosofía para esto?

¿Es esto algo dualista?

¿Debo buscar mas en los traumas que experimenta la gente con síndrome post-traumático?**

closed as unclear what you're asking by virmaior, labreuer, John Am, Swami Vishwananda, Heinrich Sep 14 '17 at 16:47

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  • Hi, and welcome to philosophy.SE! I'm not quite sure I fully grasp the question here---are you asking if a literal werewolf is human/at what point in their transformation they stop becoming human? – Canyon Aug 30 '17 at 20:19
  • Hello Canyon, and not exactly, the first point with werewolves are the bases of Humanism and Post-Humanism were those 2 Ideologies are in constant debate about where something human begins and where something animal begins. A werewolf takes this debate to the table by being something not completely animal, not something human. But I am interested in seeing that authors of philosophy have spoken of something when there is a huge internal conflict between what you are and what you want to be. 1/2 – Sobyro Aug 31 '17 at 17:13
  • But within the context of a werewolf who has actively tried to be something normal, this is constantly rejected again and again. What other book or writer can I talk about or are of interes in this context? 2/2 – Sobyro Aug 31 '17 at 19:08
  • There is a lot of recent study about the nature of animality sparked by the book "The Animal That Therefore I Am" by Jacques Derrida, but also the sociology of Cary Wolfe on animality and post-humanism. I would check out also the journal Humanimalia (depauw.edu/humanimalia) to see if they've published anything on werewolves. The only thing that I'm familiar with on this theme is Deleuze's rewriting of the image of werewolves as representations of "becomings-animals" that have nothing to do with physical werewolves but mystifications of human-animal inclusive disjunctions. – ClearMountainWay Sep 2 '17 at 0:29
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Thanks a lot to: – ClearMountainWay for guiding me in this endevor.

There is a lot of recent study about the nature of animality sparked by the book "The Animal That Therefore I Am" by Jacques Derrida.

But also the sociology of Cary Wolfe on animality and post-humanism.

I would check out also the journal Humanimalia (depauw.edu/humanimalia) to see if they've published anything on werewolves.

The only thing that I'm familiar with on this theme is Deleuze's rewriting of the image of werewolves as representations of "becomings-animals" that have nothing to do with physical werewolves but mystifications of human-animal inclusive disjunctions.

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