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I was reading a book about learning philosophy for beginners called

Introduction to Philosophy Classical and Contemporary Readings Edited by John Perry, Michael Bratman, John Martin Fischer

It says that "to read philosophy well one must read slowly, and aggressively." (Page 2) Can the same be applied when reading like physics, and mathematics, in the context of learning? I have heard of people like Descartes, and Kant who are influential in math, and Einstein (Only one I could think at the moment) in physics. Does that mean the critical reading skills can be applied in math, and physics? I am currently doing an under grad in Physics, and would like to get a masters in physics, math, and philosophy.

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The same reading skills which are being used to read philosophy in hopes of learning, and understanding it. Can they be also used to learn physics, and mathematics? Because the book I am reading an "Introduction to Philosophy Classical and Contemporary Readings Edited by John Perry, Michael Bratman, John Martin Fischer", and its says "to read philosophy well one must read slowly, and aggressively." (Page 2) So would like the same critical thinking skills, or reading skills be appropriately used for physics, and mathematics?

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    History of Philosophy by Julian Marias is a pretty good book, a traditional approach and cheap. I mention such a book as this because it seems you are using a reader, so you need a textbook or teacher. The Marias book will act to bring some cohesion to your efforts with the book of readings. – Gordon Oct 28 '17 at 4:30
  • I'm finding to difficult to see what you're asking. – PeterJ Oct 28 '17 at 12:52
  • @PeterJ I'll reword it. – EnlightenedFunky Oct 28 '17 at 15:42
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    Got it. There is a difference. In philosophy we need to be 'aggressive' in the sense of always trying to find fault with what we read and taking nothing on trust. In the sciences the communal method means that less aggression is required. We should try to argue when we read 'I think therefore I am' and it is vital to do so, but not when we read 'F=MA'. – PeterJ Oct 29 '17 at 12:20
  • @PeterJ That sounds like a legit "answer". – EnlightenedFunky Oct 29 '17 at 15:22

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