-2

Think about it, if homicide is killing people, and you are a person, if you kill yourself, you therefore are homicidal, which therefore makes you a violent person. However, suicide victims are sympathized for while people who are homicidal are frowned upon. That being said, if both involve the taking of lives, shouldn't suicidal people be looked down upon as well, for they are also homicidal? And not just to say that, but my other point here is that suicidal people tend to be hospitalized for a day, two, three, four days; receiving special treatment of telling them about how important they are; while people who have thoughts of homicide are shut away and locked up for months, years, or decades and receive a lot less treatment and are frowned upon; almost as if people want nothing to do with them. Now as I have said this, I understand that the suicidal person gets special care so they will not take their own life; however, the "homicidal" person gets very little care even though they are contemplating a very similar idea. Now, my question is, as the suicidal person receives treatment, shouldn't the homicidal person receive treatment as well, for they basically are contemplating the same thing, taking lives. So, my question is, if both suicidal people and homicidal people are thinking about taking lives, why are homicidal people treated as though they are so much less important?

closed as off-topic by virmaior, Mozibur Ullah, Joseph Weissman Dec 6 '17 at 21:16

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "While this question may be related to philosophy or occur in a philosophical context, the question itself doesn't seem to be about philosophy, and is therefore not a good fit for our site." – Joseph Weissman
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Can you edit your question to use paragraphs. Also the tag is definitely wrong. – virmaior Dec 6 '17 at 5:18
  • Historically, there was actually punishment of the deceased (corpse) for his own suicide. See Wikipedia, Suicide Legislation some information. There is more historical literature on this subject in libraries (journals), etc. – Gordon Dec 6 '17 at 22:09
1

The suicidal person and the homicidal person are not on the same level. The suicidal person is contemplating taking his "own" life. The homicidal person is contemplating taking someone else life. It's very different. And you live in a community, it's all about signals and symbols, society doesn't want to normalize homicidal behaviors or feelings, there is some red lines, and killing is one of them. Of course that simply putting people in jail or the death penalty is a failing and weak system.

But unfortunately we live in an eye for an eye society/world. People don't want solutions, or compassion, or real 'progress'. They want vengeance. And suicide is a huge problem, and believe me they don't receive any kind of treatment.

They put you in a mental institution for a few days, they give you meds to knock you out and suppress those feelings, and after they let you out. They 'pretend' to care , it's a symbol, no one really cares. We live in a sick, and selfish world. We are animals.

  • 1
    Welcome to Philosophy SE. Your answer is well formed but carries with it an emotive edge. It reads more like an opinion, which isn't a problem in itself but could be improved by backing your points up with objective links and references. For example; you say suicide is a huge problem; do you have any published statistics to back that up? Is it limited to developed countries or a particular cross-section of our society? What's the benefit of 'pretending' to care instead of actually caring? Exposing motive would be a real help to this answer. – Tim B II Dec 6 '17 at 11:37

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.