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Is there any philosophy that is similar or close to the viewpoint of that held by German philosopher Immanuel Kant as I need to put forward an argument from two Deontological ethical viewpoints.I have used the Kantian perspective, I now want to use one that is similar to it to strengthen the argument.

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Marcia Baron takes a deontological line, similar to Kant's but also critical of it, in

THREE METHODS OF ETHICS: A DEBATE. By MARCIA W. BARON, PHILIP PETTIT, and MICHAEL SLOTE. Oxford: Blackwell, 1997. Pp. vi, 285.

Baron's own :

Marcia W. Baron, Kantian Ethics Almost without Apology

ISBN 10: 0801486041 / ISBN 13: 9780801486043

may be useful - she only says 'Almost Without Apology', which so there's critical distance as well as sympathy of viewpoint.

You might also care to take a look at :

Stephen Darwall, Deontology. Published by Wiley-Blackwell.

ISBN 10: 0631231129 / ISBN 13: 9780631231127

This is a collection expressing a variety of viewpoints; here you're very likely to find some useful material both sympathetic and critical.

There are well-known similarities between Rawls and Kant but these are not close and direct enough for your purposes, I think.

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John Rawls’ Theory of Justice should help you.

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    Hi there. Normally single sentence answers are discouraged, especially if they function like a 'link' answer. It would be extremely valuable if you explain why Theory of Justice would help in this instance, and give some context as to why you think this is the best place to start additional research against the question. – Tim B II Mar 3 '18 at 2:31
  • Thank you! I will be sure to add more detail when I am free! – M. Weber Mar 3 '18 at 2:44
  • Apologies if this doesn't go here, but here is some detail explanation. GreenCoder90, if you are still here, I hope you take the time to read this. I particularly like Theory of Justice as it posits some unique thought experiments that, to me, look like Kantian ethics in action. Original position and the veil of ignorance, two key pieces of the Theory of Justice that state all justice, law, and punishment, is to be applied equally and fairly (this is a very condensed view of it, bear in mind). Rousseau's The Social Contract is where these ideas stem from for Rawls, and may be further reading. – M. Weber Mar 3 '18 at 20:44
  • Hi @M.Weber, Just to let you know, you should have a little link under your answer that allows you to edit your answer; best to put the added detail in there. Looks good BTW. – Tim B II Mar 3 '18 at 21:49

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