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Recently I saw Heinz's dilemma and actually I found that none of the actions or purposes is really wrong or right to me. But I found that punishing (e.g. imprisoning) Heinz (in the case he steals the drug) would be wrong to me.

Although my ethics do not answer whether he is wrong, various theories do (some can say it will lead to good consequences, therefore he does right action, and some can say it is violation of duty). But I hardly can understand what these theories suggest to do with those whith peoplr who were "right" or "wrong".

Therefore I'm wondering now if the question of punishment (and reward) lies within ethics. If so, what is the ethics branch studying it?

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I'm wondering now if the question of punishment (and reward) lies within ethics.

Yes.

If so, what is the ethics branch studying it?

According to this article there are two main schools of thought ("branches"?) - Utilitarianism and Retributivism.

Punishment (Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

EDIT

It sounds like you have a special interest in imprisonment, so here are a few comments.

Actually, imprisonment is punishment, because it is done with the hope to change human behavior.

Not necessarily. People can be imprisoned as a form of punishment, period. Solitary confinement and life sentences, in particular, do little to improve behavior.

People can also be imprisoned, albeit rarely, for their own protection, for observation or pending further legal action.

Keep in mind that the justice systems in some countries (e.g. the U.S.) is extraordinarily corrupt. The U.S. is known for the vast number of citizens who are in prison, along with a variety of abuses associated with prison.

Torture (not limited to solitary confinement) and rape occur in some prison systems. Innocent people can be sentenced (sometimes knowingly) to prison.

The most familiar legal loophole is the common knowledge that rich and powerful people are the least likely to be sentenced to prison. When they are sentenced, they typically get shorter terms and may be sent to special "country club prisons."

You might also want to do some research on political prisoners, juvenile detention, etc.

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  • I know what punishment is. As well as reward. Actually, imprisonment is punishment, because it is done with the hope to change human behavior. But I agree that imprisonment exists as well to isolate socially dangerous individuals from society.
    – rus9384
    May 13 '18 at 13:19
  • Right and wrong are subjective matters and are not bound by some universal form of "good" or "bad". There is also a stretch on the matter which must take into account all circumstances of every individual involved. For example, one may consider a drunk driver running over a child as "bad" -- however upon finding that child had ran out into the road immediately after stabbing their family to death, and that the driver could not swerve in time (even sober), that this was a good thing or in balance. To make a judgment of right or wrong, is not something humans can do reliably. May 14 '18 at 10:41
  • I say that punishment itself (not just imprisonment) is made to teach people a lesson (take kids punishment, for example). Therefore an imprisonment without the purpose of rehabilitation is not a punishment but just an isolation.
    – rus9384
    May 14 '18 at 12:47
  • Do philosophers have a special definition for the word "punishment"? If not, then I'll stick to plain English. But either way, imprison is more than mere isolation; it can be a form of torture. May 14 '18 at 13:13

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