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Watch this first. https://www.bbc.com/news/av/disability-42198169/completely-blind-backpacker-travelling-around-the-world

Despite his different senses is he experiencing the spirituality of places, is the experience the same?

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No matter what you use or have, you will experience the world differently from others. No other person can be same. Not everybody can experience the world same and through same perception. Our emotions, feelings, thoughts or intuition are very unique for the person. I believe fining the identical level of experience would be very difficult, especially if we dig into cultures, religions and social structures.

  • It would be very helpful to readers if you could provide some references to support this viewpoint. At the least give some context from the position of a particular school of thought or similar tradition. - Welcome to the SE. – christo183 Dec 2 '18 at 14:27
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What individuals are perceiving can’t be verified using scientific method or reason/logic. Two people with all the same senses could possibly be experiencing the world in two completely different ways. For example, collectively humans have agreed on what the color red is. However, neither scientific method, nor reason/logic can verify that what one person sees as red is the same color another individual sees as red. Now scientific method is useful for telling you that light is a wave, and what the length/frequency of the wave is for the color red. But that’s not verifying how each individual sees/experiences the color red.

To answer your question, I don’t believe the academic community has come up with a way to definitely prove the world is experienced the same way from one individual to the next. Regardless of the number of senses used to perceive the world.

On a lighter note, if you’re a fan of movies, there’s actually a great scene in “Good Will Hunting” that kind of conveys this idea.

  • Rodolfo, respectfully I don’t think it’s that simple. Experience is unverifiable empirically. You can’t use scientific method to prove experience is different. So I take issue with saying all of existence individually experiences reality subjectively, simply because you can’t say it with certainty. I’ll add that language, although the most efficient way we’ve come up with, is still imperfect in expressing ideas. The mere fact language exists is an objective way of interpreting and comparing experience with one an other. – James Nov 28 '18 at 23:01
  • I agree that experience is unverifiable empirically. But it’s noteworthy that, although we cannot be sure whether other people experience the same visual or sound perception as we do or not, one thing that is certain is that the structure (i.e., the number and types of perception components and the spectral characteristics of each perception) of each kind of perception is the same across people. For example, the vision always has 6 components (i.e., color, brightness, shape, dimension, acuity, and velocity) and always have its own unique spectral characteristics (i.e., the color spectrum). – user287279 Nov 29 '18 at 11:14
  • That is different from the sound, which always has 5 components (i.e., pitch, loudness, timbre, envelope, and duration) and always have its own unique spectral characteristics (i.e., the musical scale, which has drastically different characteristics from the color spectrum). More details of this discussion can be found at P.Q. 2.6. of this article. – user287279 Nov 29 '18 at 11:16
  • I'd say each of us might as well live in a different universe so different are our responses to sensory data thanks to our associations, conditioning, attachments, preferences and histories. . – PeterJ Dec 2 '18 at 13:49
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Experience is absolutely subjective.

If it would be objective, we would be able to compare it, objectively. But experiences cannot be compared. How can you say if you feel the same as me when listening Beethoven's fifth?

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