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I am reading Collingwood's essay in metaphysics and I have hard time in understanding his argument to the conclusion that Catholic Faith consists in (part) of absolute presuppositions of Greek thought which were missed by ancient thinkers.

His discussion is rather brief, so I would be happy if someone was aware of place where he is more precise.

For example Collingwood claims that Aristotle's idea of one God is connected with absolute presupposition that there is one natural world which is itself unified and independent of ours will. This is something I find believable.

Next he states that Aristotle's idea of eternal existence of uncreated world is connected with idea that we learn about existence of world from our experience. However the fact is that we do not know from experience that world (or motion) exist. No argument with that.

Now however, there is a jump in though I do not understand. He claims that Christian doctrine of the creation of the world is just connected with absolute presupposition which states that natural world (and motion in it) exists.

I do not know how to understand that because in my mind statement that world is eternal sounds pretty much like statement that existence of the world does not need explanation. An as such it seems to be equivalent to the statement that its existence is absolute presupposition of natural science.

I would be thankful if someone could give me reference to some further readings or even just propose some way to interpret above Collingwood statements.

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    "Aristotle's idea of eternal existence of uncreated world is connected with idea that we learn about existence of world from our experience" . A was an "empiricist" deeply involved with the study of natural facts concerning physical world, biology, animals, plants. Thus, the possibility of knowing the facts of the natural world by way of experience is obviously presupposed by A's philosophy. – Mauro ALLEGRANZA Dec 13 '18 at 9:59

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