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Why did Nietzsche think that only the happiness of higher types mattered?

Was it due to some repulsion from normal people and their behaviours? Or was he just fascinated by greatness?

I would assume it's not because he believed very few people can be of benefit to humanity, as Marx may have something important to say about that.

Or, that only some people are genuinely capable of tragedy, suffering and beneficence. If only because I find that his analysis of human malice quite wanting.

So, why? Is it something to do with moral anti-realism?

  • is it just something about the scope of 'care' and who we, anyone, can care for and improve the life of? – user35983 Mar 18 at 18:08
  • Sorry the PDF is inactive. Try this. marxists.org/archive/lukacs/works/destruction-reason/ch03.htm – Gordon Mar 18 at 19:29
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    Between Sils Maria and the Riviera. Lol. It's true he was not rich, but thoroughly bourgeois he was. He was two peas in a pod with the sister he "hated". Yes, he wanted to be great but it takes time for philosophy to catch-on. In the case of his time with Wagner, he saw greatness, but music is immediate. It fascinates the public more quickly. – Gordon Mar 18 at 19:35
  • "I would assume it's not because he believed very few people can be of benefit to humanity, as Marx may have something important to say about that"? Why would it matter to Nietzsche what Marx had to say? He never read him. And why would "benefit of humanity" matter to Nietzsche at all? He saw most of humanity as industrial waste in the creation of superhumanity, and for supermen "happiness" is a false goal. "Do I strive after happiness? No, I strive after my works!"  Thus Spoke Zarathustra . – Conifold Mar 18 at 19:38
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    To more directly answer your question: reaction-formation. Nietzsche's aristocrats were ascetic, hard. True aristocrats, think the land the hunting and so on. We philosophers were to be rather Prussian. But this probably was not Nietzsche himself, he was probably the senitimental type. Dionysus is himself a rather conflicted God. psychcentral.com/encyclopedia/reaction-formation – Gordon Mar 18 at 20:32

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