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When one makes an assertion does it automatically become an argument ?. answer this first before proceeding?

if No, where is the Distinction?

For example, one says "it is wet on the ground, therefore, it rained" which is either TRUE OR FALSE. if the assertion false does it become a fallacy argument

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    Usually, an argument has one or more premises and a conclusion. Thus, a single statement is not an argument. – Mauro ALLEGRANZA Apr 25 at 15:46
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    An argument is valid when it is not possible taht all the premises are TRUE and the conclusion is FALSE. – Mauro ALLEGRANZA Apr 25 at 15:47
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    A logical fallacy is a reasoning that is not valid. – Mauro ALLEGRANZA Apr 25 at 15:49
  • If we read "it is wet on the ground, therefore, it rained" as an argument with premise "it is wet on the ground" and conclusiom "it rained", it is not valid because the argument form "p, therefore q" is not valid. – Mauro ALLEGRANZA Apr 25 at 16:12
  • Well elaborated Thanks., – stevebaros Apr 25 at 16:50
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Usually, an argument has one or more premises and a conclusion. Thus, a single statement is not an argument

An argument is valid when it is not possible taht all the premises are TRUE and the conclusion is FALSE

A logical fallacy is a reasoning that is not valid.

If we read "it is wet on the ground, therefore, it rained" as an argument with premise "it is wet on the ground" and conclusiom "it rained", it is not valid because the argument form "p, therefore q" is not valid.

CREDIT https://philosophy.stackexchange.com/users/4752/mauro-allegranza

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