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In the page 536 of von Wright's Ludwig Wittgenstein, A Biographical Sketch in The Philosophical Review, Vol. 64, No. 4 (Oct., 1955), he tells:

The author of the Tractatus thought he had solved all philosophical problems. It was consistent with this view that he should give up philosophy. The publication of the book was largely due to Russell. In 1919 the two friends met in Holland to discuss the manuscript. The problem of finding a publisher caused difficulties and the matter was further complicated by Wittgenstein's strong disapproval of Russell's introduction to the book. Finally, Wittgenstein turned his back on the whole undertaking. The book was published in 1922 by Kegan Paul in London, in a German-English parallel text. In the previous year the German text had appeared in the last issue of Ostwald's Annalen der A Naturphilosophie. The English translation contains a number of errors which corrupt the meaning and which one would wish to see corrected as soon as possible.

So what exactly means "Wittgenstein's strong disapproval of Russell's introduction to the book [Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus]"?

Is there a text where we can see that literally explained by Wittgenstein?

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    What Wittgenstein wrote in a letter to Russell is:"There's so much of it that I'm not quite in agreement with -- both where you're critical of me and also where you're simply trying to elucidate my point of view. But that doesn't matter. The future will pass judgement on us." Russell simply did not understand the treatment of language and its limits in the Tractatus, and there was little point to detailing the specifics. You can read some discussion of it by Iglesias here – Conifold May 29 at 0:09
  • Thanks for the reference, @Conifold! I think what I was looking for is exactly what this text by Iglesias is about. – JorgeAmVF May 29 at 0:22
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  • Thanks again, @MauroALLEGRANZA! I'd invite you to answer here after I read your answer to another question and I must say both your comments are really helpful. – JorgeAmVF May 29 at 9:58

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