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Nietzsche said this (as found here):

"It seems to me that a human being with the very best of intentions can do immeasurable harm, if he is immodest enough to wish to profit those whose spirit and will are concealed from him."

It was in a letter written in German. In English, the word "profit" is a transitive verb. I think you could profit for or to someone else. You could also profit from someone else. The lack of the word "from" in the English translation has me concerned. Who was profiting?

This is not a duplicate as this question is much more focused. The other question asked what the quote meant in general, and the answer is that it could not be completely determined what it meant. In light of that this new question asks "who was profiting" and is targeted toward people who can read German as it pertains to a specific part of the translation.

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As many philosophical statements are, this one isn't exactly written in the venacular. However, it is possible to reduce this grammar to point out who profits.

"It seems to me that a human being with the very best of intentions can do immeasurable harm, if he is immodest enough to wish to profit those whose spirit and will are concealed from him."

Rewriting the sentence: A person with good intentions can do much harm if he is arrogant enough to help those he doesn't understand.

From Google's definition of profit, "to obtain a benefit". Benefit is from the Latin meaning "to make good or well".

In the quotation, the understanding is that the actions of the do-gooder are to profit those he wishes to help. For instance, I was unloading my car one day, and a neighbor who saw my car door approached my car, looked around and didn't see me, and closed my door. He likely intended to do well by keeping my door closed to prevent theft of damage, but instead worked against me because I hadn't wanted my car door closed. In this case, a man with the very best intentions did cause me measurable harm, since he was immodest enough to presume that closing my car door would profit me.

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