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After reading Nietzsche, I got hooked on reading books full of aphorisms, especially when they touch a large number of topics. I am wondering if there's any other famous philosophers who like writing aphorisms like Nietzsche.

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    Many of the Buddhist and Hindu commentaries are written as aphorisms. – Swami Vishwananda Dec 28 '19 at 9:43
  • Welcome to SE Philosophy! Thanks for your contribution. Please take a quick moment to take the tour or find help. You can perform searches here or seek additional clarification at the meta site. – J D Dec 29 '19 at 15:46
  • There are too many examples to start listing them. A great deal of the 'Wisdom' literature comes in aphoristic form. – user20253 Dec 30 '19 at 12:16
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An other writer of aphorisms, whom Nietzsche new and appreciated is

La Rochefoucauld, Maxims

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/9105/9105-h/9105-h.htm

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Socrates wrote some pretty good aphorisms - some of them can be found in Plato's Apology.

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Consider looking at Adorno's Minima Moralia which has a few sections devoted to very short aphorisms.

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You might check out out Blaise Pascal’s Pensées where you will find this one:

“All of man’s unhappiness comes from his inability to stay peacefully alone in his room.”

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  • Welcome to SE Philosophy! Thanks for your contribution. Please take a quick moment to take the tour or find help. You can perform searches here or seek additional clarification at the meta site. – J D Dec 29 '19 at 16:04
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Aphorisms are a common philosophical tool, one used by any philosopher who approaches points that are metaphysical, mystical, or otherwise difficult to express directly in language. Aphorisms (like koans) are meant to draw the reader beyond the immediacy of language by posing an position that demands active reflection rather than passive acceptance.

There was a trend towards aphoristic writing in the late 19th and early 20th centuries: Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Husserl, maybe Heidegger, certainly the later Wittgenstein, portions of Sartre, Camus, and other existentialists... That may have been related to the upswing in non-representational art (like cubism, surrealism, da-da, and stream-of-consciousness literature) that occurred around the same time. However, it's worth keeping in mind that a lot of the more aphoristic works of that period were published posthumously from the notes of authors, so the aphoristic style may reflect the incompleteness of the author's own thoughts at the time of his death, rather than any particular stylistic intent.

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You might enjoy reading the works of Emil Cioran(there are plenty of his books translated into English from French and Romanian). It covers all the existential problems(and especially religion, where his ideas are very interesting, even though he is usually termed as being a nihilist) of man formulated into striking aphorisms.

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