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What are the differences between Post hoc fallacy and Slippery slope fallacy? Why they are different?

  • Hi, welcome to Philosophy SE. We discourage one line posts because it is hard to figure out what the poster has in mind and answer that pointedly. In post hoc ergo propter hoc that the "consequence" follows the "cause" is not in question, only that they are causally related is, as opposed to having a common cause or being coincidental. In contrast, in the slippery slope it is not in question that something can be a causal link in a chain leading to unintended consequences, only that the circumstances are aligned so that it will be is. – Conifold Mar 15 at 8:49
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    Presuming B happens because of A because B happens after A is post hoc. Presuming that since A causes B causes C causes D, that A will necessarily cause D is slippery slope. Often times the complexity of causation is such that putting many causes and effects together means they "affect or interfere" with each other due to complexity. (It's actually much more complicated than that.) – J D Mar 15 at 19:12
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According to J Ds comment,

Presuming B happens because of A because B happens after A is post hoc. Presuming that since A causes B causes C causes D, that A will necessarily cause D is slippery slope. Often times the complexity of causation is such that putting many causes and effects together means they "affect or interfere" with each other due to complexity. (It's actually much more complicated than that.)

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