2

Person who win the jackpot in lottery will not go to work.

If everybody wins the jackpot, nobody will go to work.

If nobody goes to work, the society cannot function.

Therefore, the government should not allow any lottery game.

I think the main problem is that winning jackpot is not easy, but this argument assume it is very common.

If this is a fallacy, is there a name for it?

1
  • It is close to a statistical fallacy called overgeneralization, assuming some behavior to be representative of an entire population. – Conifold May 6 '20 at 18:20
0

The error can't be seen unless we add the missing false premise.
(1) Everyone wins the jackpot.
(2) Person who win the jackpot in lottery will not go to work.
(3) If everybody wins the jackpot, nobody will go to work.
(4) If nobody goes to work, the society cannot function.
(5) Therefore, the government should not allow any lottery game.

Validity and Soundness
A deductive argument is said to be valid if and only if it takes a form that makes it impossible for the premises to be true and the conclusion nevertheless to be false. Otherwise, a deductive argument is said to be invalid.

A deductive argument is sound if and only if it is both valid, and all of its premises are actually true. Otherwise, a deductive argument is unsound. https://www.iep.utm.edu/val-snd/

When we add the missing premise we can see that the argument is unsound.
The second premise is not needed.

5
  • There is no missing premise. As written the conclusion is clear but the OP uses wording in the conclusion that IS NOT FOUNS IN THE PREMISES. So you dis not mention this obvious flaw. How can you think a deductive argument can have an odd number of premises if you know deductive reasoning? If there are two related premises the a conclusion is undeniable per two premises. Hidden premises still count. – Logikal May 7 '20 at 12:56
  • The first sentence is NOT A PREMISE. It is extra information describing what the argument is about. Also notice the structure is not like the If . . . .THEN structure below it. The conclusion should be if everybody wins the jackpot then society would not function. The language in a argument needs to be of the same kind. The same kind also needs to be related by common terms in other parts of the communication aka called the middle term. The first sentence has no common terms with other wording below it. – Logikal May 7 '20 at 13:07
  • @Logikal There was a missing premise when I wrote my answer. – polcott May 7 '20 at 15:01
  • "The first sentence is NOT A PREMISE" The OP rewrote his post so that the first sentence is no longer needed. My (1), (3) and conclusion we cut-and-pasted from his original post. I added (2) Because without it there was no complete argument. – polcott May 7 '20 at 15:14
  • When I edit my question, polcott not yet posted his answer. – fairytale May 9 '20 at 9:37
2

The logical conclusion is that the government shouldn’t allow a lottery where everyone wins the jackpot. That’s a valid conclusion from the data given and makes sense. Without the “everyone wins the jackpot” it’s not a valid conclusion.

I wouldn’t say it’s a fallacy, just a mistake in the argument.

0

Correctly built or not, your argument seems to be using the slippery slope fallacy, aka number 15 on this page.

0

There is an element of false dichotomy. The conclusion, that lotteries should be banned, ignores that the current solution (lotteries where only a rare few win) is very effective at avoiding the downfall of society.

...but this seems more like a mask of arguments against things like welfare, universal basic income, and similar ideas. The problem with those arguments is that the first two premises are false, and the third is an assumption rather than a fact.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.