1

Time: It is a mathematical dimension to measure the change of state (any motion) of Existence (includes universe/multiverse/entire creation).

In order to travel in Time, one has to change the state of entire existence to the previous/future state which is impossible.

We need to consider our time measurement techniques again. Should we consider time dilation shown on our clocks as actual time dilation?

The laws of existence affect all the physical entities in a different way. All the physical entities have a different effect of gravity and velocity on them depending on their nature. It is not necessary that our biological clock of living beings and other physical phenomena would be affected in the same time measurement scale as it affects the normal clocks and atomic clocks.

Please elaborate and correct me if I am wrong... Thank you

5
  • What is the question, exactly? If it is according to the title, then you might find answers here: philosophy.stackexchange.com/questions/8730/… and here: philosophy.stackexchange.com/questions/10743/… – Mr. White Jul 26 '20 at 16:09
  • Technically, time travel is predicted by relativistic physics. Of course, that's forward, not backward. See the twin paradox. – J D Jul 26 '20 at 17:21
  • "In order to travel in Time, one has to change the state of entire existence" is fallacious. Time travel (even to the past) need not involve changing the timeline, it may already incorporate temporal loops, see Novikov's self-consistency principle. It is only combination of time travel with some sort of libertarian free will capacity that leads to paradoxes. – Conifold Jul 26 '20 at 22:36
  • "In order to travel in Time, one has to change the state of entire existence to the previous/future state which is impossible" That might make sense if you assume the philosophy of time known as presentism, but the alternate philosophy known as eternalism says that objects and events in your past haven't ceased to exist, they exist at a different location in time, so traveling back to them would be more akin to traveling to a different location in space. – Hypnosifl Jul 27 '20 at 3:22
  • To quote an answer from this question "Antimatter is in every precise meaningful sense matter moving backward in time". Yet antimatter is a very real thing. – Graviton Jul 27 '20 at 12:18
1

You are posing two different questions here.

Time travel is considered impossible because it leads directly to a universe where effects precede causes, and things like energy would no longer be conserved. This would be a very big deal.

Relativistic time dilation is real, and it affects all physical processes equally. This includes all biological processes as well, because on the micro scale they consist entirely of physical processes. This principle guarantees that all clocks slow down at high velocities: mechanical clocks, electronic clocks, the growth rates for your hair and fingernails, and your own thought processes.

So, let us perform the following thought experiment. Imagine you are in a speeding spaceship, and that your mental clock is not slowed down at relativistic velocities, while all your mechanical clocks were. Then, by comparing your mental perception of the passage of time with the movement of the hands of that clock, you could tell what your absolute velocity was without looking out the window. This would invalidate special relativity and that entire edifice of knowledge, proven valid in every experimental test thus performed on it, would crumble and fall- but, for the reasons listed above, this will not happen.

2
  • Thanks for your answer however as you mentioned that Relativistic time dilation affects all the physical processes equally. I have tried to find if there is any empirical research done to check equal dilation in all clocks. To my best knowledge there is none. – Harjeet Singh Jul 26 '20 at 19:21
  • Harjeet, let us perform the following thought experiment. Imagine you are in a speeding spaceship, and that your mental clock is not slowed down at relativistic velocities, while all your mechanical clocks were. Then, by comparing your mental perception of the passage of time with the movement of the hands of that clock, you could tell what your absolute velocity was without looking out the window. This would invalidate special relativity and that entire edifice of knowledge, proven valid in every experimental test thus performed on it, would crumble and fall. That is not likely to happen! – niels nielsen Jul 26 '20 at 20:14

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.