2

According to the Routledges History of Philosophy, Vol 6 - The Age of German Idealism, Schelling

had begun to characterize his new standpoint as “positive philosophy,” in contradistinction to the purely “negative” philosophy of Kant, Fichte, and Hegel—as well as of his own Jena period.

and

Schelling’s dissatisfaction with the purely formal or “negative” concept of nature defended by Fichte, together with his admiration for Spinoza’s interpretation of nature as a self-developing whole (natura naturans)

Is this because, roughly, we have nature conforming to man? ie Kants copernican revolution of objects conforming to consciousness, Hegels World conforming to Spirit and Fichtes formal concept of nature.

2

The aim of Schelling´s positive philosophy is to think the existence (the "quod") and not the essence (the "quid") as negative philosophy had done. That is the reason why he speaks about the "Daß" of God and not about the "Was" (the essence) of God. For Hegel, the Absolute´s necessity is contained in the concept. The whole phenomenology of spirit is a logic consequence of that original necessity of the concept. The Absolute of positive philosophy is not necessary but free. The abyss of God, is not a "Was" but a "Daß". God, that is, the Absolute, is first of all a existence (das rein Seyende), and only then a essence (Gottheit, Wesen). The Absolute of the late philosophy of Schelling is a "living" God, that is, God is no chained to any logical necessity. God is an absolute abyss of freedom.

Schelling’s dissatisfaction with the purely formal or “negative” concept of nature defended by Fichte, together with his admiration for Spinoza’s interpretation of nature as a self-developing whole (natura naturans)

I think that this is not in accordance with positive philosophy but with the "Identitätsphilosophy". Schelling´s dissatisfation deals with the fact that neither Kant nor Fichte had attempted to think the prius of philosophy as a pure existence (Fichte tried, but he ended in a subjetivism).

Kind regards

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.