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What do you call an illogical statement that seems logical because of grammar? Do you have any example of a philosopher who wrote a grammatical sentence in the hope of constructing an logical argument, but the sentence falls flat on its face when analyzed logically analytically piece by piece?

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    Hegel has been accused of this, IIRC (by Popper???). Personally, for what it's worth, my memory of ZEN AND THE ART OF MOTORCYCLE MAINTENANCE is of grammatical but ultimately illogical (or sublogical) rambling about "Quality." The name for this phenomenon? Sophistry. Jun 22 at 3:41
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    Do you have an example of what you are talking about? I don't know what it would mean for an illogical statement to "seem" logical. Jun 22 at 6:06
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    "illogical" is probably not the right word... We have the well-known Chomsky's example of a grammatical sentences that has no meaning: "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously". Jun 22 at 7:28
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    For a different context, see another well-know example: Carnap's analysys in Überwindung der Metaphysik durch logische Analyse der Sprache (1931) of a statement from Heidegger's lecture What Is Metaphysics? (1929): "The Nothing itself nothings. [Das nicht nichtet]" Jun 22 at 7:46
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    "What do you call an illogical statement that seems logical because of grammar?" Meaningless. Jun 22 at 7:47

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