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I would like to share a reasoning.

We consider that an Engineer, before starting to build his project, draws up a construction plan. In the case of a Deity that promises eternal life in paradise, we can consider that the time of this universe will be infinite, since they will live forever.

Therefore, it seems to me more plausible that we are still in the blueprint of the project, that is, within the thought of this divinity, than that we were actually created. Because the deity would still be processing such endless time.

That is, If God designed an infinite paradise, whether of space and time, he is still designing it and we were not created yet.

EDIT:

Both infinite paradise and infinite living would require infinite time.

However, reading about the subject in the meantime, infinite or eternal, implies that there was no beginning and no end, it always existed, in the perhaps literal sense. It also depends on the interpretation, because infinity can also have a beginning, like things that begin and have no end.

There are infinities different from other infinities.

But, yes, it would be as if God were still building (Mentally) his plan of creation, considering the infinite time. Now since he would plan everything before building, and for infinity, we would still be in his mind, for not having finished his plan.

Unless he, as creator, just created the rules of the universe, how to formulate an equation of everything, put the ingredients together and did it. But then I question the authenticity of my free will, now I would only be obeying a formula.

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    Let's first establish that there is a God and what it is before speculating about the blueprints of their hypothetical projects?
    – armand
    Aug 7 at 0:52
  • Is there any difference between being within the thought of this divinity and being actually created? God's thought itself may already have the power of creation. And God is omniscient, what does he need a plan for? Especially one that takes so long to design.
    – Conifold
    Aug 7 at 4:39
  • I love the philosophy se. you have some very educated philosophers taking the time to comment. In other se’s youd only be downvoted and probably deleted, which is not meant as my opinion of anything
    – Al Brown
    Aug 7 at 8:30
  • Shouldn't the title be "Are we still in God's mind?"
    – kutschkem
    Aug 9 at 14:22
  • You're assigning this god, one of over 6000 known in this world, human qualities. How do you know such particulars? Btw, life is good, but I don't want to live forever. Once around is enough.
    – user48488
    Aug 17 at 1:29
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You assert that the planning phase must be infinite, because the creation is infinite.

It would then appear to follow that your creator god will never actually finish its work, because the planning stage cannot be concluded if it is infinite.

This would nullify it being a creator god; because it's never, ever going to actually create anything in this model. At best, you've got what appears to be a brain in a jar, and at worst, a god standing on its own hands.

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  • Furthermore, a time period that begins but doesn’t end may be considered infinite (what is it if it’s not) and so it’s logically consistent that a period that end but has no beginning is also infinite - whether either or both is eternal depends on your definition of the word. So an infinite planning phase followed by an infinite implementation phase is not logically inconsistent.
    – Frog
    Aug 27 at 20:20
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Aquinas and other Christian-theologian philosophers interpret "divine creation" as not an event in the past or at the beginning of time, but a non-temporal cause of the existence of the present moment. Prior physical events causally determine the content of the physical events that comprise the present moment, but God is the cause of the existence of these contents.

Descartes also held that view: everything would just pop out of existence if there wasn't a moment-to-moment present cause of existence itself. So that jives with Conifold's comment, where he states that 1) God's thought itself may be equivalent to creation and 2) God's omniscience presupposes a need for a plan.

Supposing that an omniscient and omnipotent "creator" of "existence" exists, Aquinas and those other kindred-minded theorists' rendition is the most elegant and appealing interpretation I've come across: There is no planning stage that takes some duration of time; the existence of things is just God's thought of those things.

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  • Conifold's comment could be deleted; it would be good if you quoted it or at least summarised it. Aug 11 at 14:06
  • This is the one I was referring to: "Is there any difference between being within the thought of this divinity and being actually created? God's thought itself may already have the power of creation. And God is omniscient, what does he need a plan for? Especially one that takes so long to design. – Conifold Aug 7 at 4:39"
    – Dayv87
    Aug 11 at 19:59

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