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This is from Husserl's Phenomenology, an article he wrote for the Encyclopedia Britannica:

Together with this philosophical phenomenology, but not yet separated from it, however, there also came into being a new psychological discipline parallel to it in method and content: the a priori pure or “phenomenological” psychology, which raises the reformational claim to being the basic methodological foundation on which alone a scientifically rigorous empirical psychology can be established. An outline of this psychological phenomenology, standing nearer to our natural thinking, is well suited to serve as a preliminary step that will lead up to an understanding of philosophical phenomenology.

Husserl is claiming that phenomenology is the “basic methodological foundation on which alone a scientifically rigorous empirical psychology can be established.” Why is this a reformational claim?

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  • Here Husserl is claiming that a new kind of a priori pure psychology, aka phenomenological psychology, came into being from a long period of empirical psychology research/experiment effort and claims acting as an independent basic methodological foundation and reformation of the scientifically rigorous empirical psychology. Husserl endorses such a claim and also claims it's well suited to serve as a preliminary step to further understand his philosophical transcendental phenomenology... Jun 24 at 5:00

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