1

In the event of an existing god wanting to deliver a message to mankind and choosing one person for it, how could this person prove, if possible, that he speaks in the name of God?

Edit: Please note that prophecies are not restricted to predictions about future, the word refers to any communication between the divine entity and the prophet. Therefore its not as easy as waiting to see if prophecies come true.

2

Well, that would certainly depend on which "god" and prophet you were referring to. The Christian God has made it very simple: see if the prophet's prophecies are actually fulfilled. Old Testament prophets usually prophesied of things soon to come, before prophesying of long-term events. Thus, Joseph, not strictly a prophet, but gifted with the ability to interpret dreams, foresaw 7 years of abundance followed by 7 years of hunger. You simply had to wait 8 years to see whether or not he was legitimate.

To turn this into a more generic answer. The best way of establishing the legitimacy of a prophet is to test whether his prophecies are fulfilled. A good rule of thumb may be that a legitimate prophet will be direct, non-contradictory and unambiguous. So a prophecy like "next year this time, there will be war" is probably true, or at least can be tested quite easily. While something like "the serpent will shake its tail twice and then the hidden grapefruit will spill over the onyx throne" is probably horse-pucky.

If a "god" takes the trouble to send a message, it would probably be easy to understand.

  • Thanks for your answer, please check the edit i made to the question. – Natxo Jan 9 '14 at 14:26
  • I don't have enough points to view edits. – Captain Kenpachi Jan 9 '14 at 14:41
  • 1
    Strange, here it goes: "Please note that prophecies are not restricted to predictions about future, the word refers to any communication between the divine entity and the prophet. Therefore its not as easy as waiting to see if prophecies come true." – Natxo Jan 9 '14 at 15:02
1

This upcoming weekend's pro football playoff scores. What else can prove one's omniscience besides accurate quantifiable predictions of future events?

  • Not all prophets make predictions and they claim to be prophets. – Natxo Jan 10 '14 at 9:12
1

In Spinoza's biblical study, the TTP or Tractatus Theoligico Politicus and as a well-respected biblical scholar, he examined the text to determine what could be verified as 'divinely inspired' directives on how to obey the Law. He discovered that each prophet, including Moses [tablets], each substantiated their claims of divine inspiration in the form of some 'sign'. This sign, so claimed Spinoza, verified the authenticity of the prophet's message. My suggestion would be to read this for your self and decide then what prophecy, miracles and divine inspiration entail. @Natxo, regards, CS

0

The question is I think is misconstrued. The Judean people in Biblical times had a tradition of Prophets and prophecy. Its only within this tradition that Prophets make sense.

Proof is a logical concept, generally derived from the Greek tradition of clear statements and clear reasoning as exemplified in Euclid, Spinoza, Descartes.

One does not prove God. One either believes or does not. This is why the Biblical & Quranic verses stress faith.

Spinozas Ethics did not prove God. He took that as granted, as irrefutable and as clear as distinct an idea as some take physicalism today.

  • I can believe in god, but i want to know if someone claiming to speak in his name is mocking us. The question is clear, all religions (not god itself) could be based on someones inventions. – Natxo Jan 10 '14 at 9:11

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.