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I'm reading about causality in the Treatise of Human Nature by D. Hume but I can't seem to find out exactly what he considers objects to be when talking about causes and effects. At some points he talks about objects, and their actions being causes and effects, but at other points talks about an event 'ceaser was killed' as being causal too.

I have read from other Empiricist authors different opinions about what causes and effects are. And, modern texts state mainly events as causes and effects, although older texts do not. But since fire is a cause of heat I think that the view that all causes and effects are events is incorrect.

So, does anyone know what Hume considers as the objects of cause and effect? Or any other author that might be able to help me understand it a bit more concretely?

Thanks

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    Re your "he talks about objects, and their actions being causes and effects", aren't their actions are nothing but events such as "you kick a ball"? Also when he talks about objects he means existence of objects which could also be said to be an existential event from the POV of free logic... Commented Oct 7, 2022 at 1:39
  • "since fire is a cause of heat I think that the view that all causes and effects are events is incorrect"... Maybe not: combustion is the cause of fire and heat. Commented Oct 7, 2022 at 13:31
  • Hume argues either that (1) causes and effects are an illusion, there is only constant conjunction or (2) causes and effects are outside of human experience and therefore all we have to go on is constant conjunction. So, I don't think it makes sense to ask what he thinks causes and effects are. Commented Oct 7, 2022 at 14:43
  • Hume does not write in these terms, but he seems to think of events as the terms of causation. Because events (impressions or ideas in Hume's terms) are the primary building blocks for Hume. He conceives objects as themselves being constructs from events (i.e. impressions or ideas). Objects are bundles of events. Commented Oct 9, 2022 at 9:07
  • Whoever it was that thought of the billiards ball analogy for causality must be awarded a gold medal. Curiously, there's no Nobel Prize for philosophy? Why?
    – Hudjefa
    Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 13:49

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