Linked Questions

8 votes
5 answers
3k views

How would Kant have responded to Darwin's conception of human evolution?

How would Kant have responded to Darwin? That is, how would Kant's theory on the individual as being comprised of a unity of consciousness (in his critique on pure reason), with the theory of Darwin's ...
patrick's user avatar
  • 81
12 votes
2 answers
4k views

How did Kant define knowledge?

A recent question about the Plato's formula K=JTB (knowledge is justified true belief) made me curious as to what Kant thought on the matter. In the prefaces and the Introduction to the first Critique ...
Conifold's user avatar
  • 43.5k
6 votes
2 answers
445 views

Is German idealism ontological, epistemic, or something more abstract?

On one hand Kant's transcendental idealism seems purely ontological: His noumena/phenomena distinction is essentially a form of dualism. Add to that: Marx considered himself a materialist in ...
Alexander S King's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
3k views

Can a rationalist ever be a materialist?

Note that I am using rationalist in its strict philosophical sense, as in rationalist like Descartes or Leibniz, not rationalist as it might be understood colloquially. from the Encyclopedia ...
Alexander S King's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
1k views

For Husserl, how can we know things in themselves?

I don't quite understand the nature of "going back to things themselves". How does Husserl break away from Kant?
Miniz's user avatar
  • 61
5 votes
6 answers
420 views

Why must things in themselves remain wholly unknown?

I'm on the Transcendental Aesthetic (and so am well aware that Kant's reasoning here may become clearer later on) -- what confuses me is how it seems to follow, from the discovery that time and space, ...
WolandBarthes's user avatar
1 vote
7 answers
581 views

Kantian things in themselves not in space or time. How do we locate them?

I have one nagging question about things in themselves being outside of space and time. How do we locate objects in space and time? Why are some objects in our vicinity and others far away? The ...
Marek's user avatar
  • 69
3 votes
3 answers
668 views

Kant and Error in his Transcendental Idealism

How would Kant handle errors in our perceptions of the world in his transcendental idealism? If what is external to us is so heavily meditated and contributed to by our mental apparatuses, how do you ...
Apodictic Apple Juice's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
435 views

Kant vs Scientific Rationalism - Do we need the Ding an Sich

I actually like Kant's distinction between noumena and phenomena. But I have a nagging doubt. If we look at modern physics, appearances can be explained by entities such as atoms, electrons and quarks ...
Marek's user avatar
  • 69
2 votes
1 answer
287 views

Why did Kant import the Greek 'nooúmenon' for describing his noumenon?

Source: p 216, Philosophy: The Classics (4 ed, 2014) by Nigel Warburton PhD in Philosophy (Cambridge) Kant distinguishes between the world we experience (the world of phenomena), and the ...
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
360 views

Can we conceive of noumena and do we need to?

The encyclopedia Britannica says: Kant’s immediate successors in German Idealism in fact rejected the noumenal as having no existence for man’s intelligence A few days ago I asked another ...
user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
240 views

Two Kinds of Understanding

"Kant concludes §17 by contrasting the human understanding, which requires an act of synthesis to establish its unity, with another possible kind of understanding. This would be an understanding in ...
Dmitri Freund's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
147 views

can kantian archetypes represent a priori concepts

In Michel Foucault's Folie et Déraison: Histoire de la Folie à l'âge Classique(History of Madness), he describes how society, throughout history, view(ed/s) and react(ed/s) to madness. The primary ...
NationWidePants's user avatar