Linked Questions

65
votes
12answers
8k views

How can an uneducated but rational person differentiate between science and religion?

I recently found myself unable to respond to the statement "But the big bang theory is just another creation myth!" during a science vs. religion argument. I found it very difficult to explain the ...
10
votes
11answers
7k views

Does philosophy belong to empirical science or formal science?

According to Wikipedia, science can be divided into empirical science (such as natural science and social science) and formal science (such as mathematics, logic, statistics). I was wondering if ...
10
votes
8answers
705 views

Can one speak unambiguously of “The” Scientific Method?

When people in general discuss science, they talk about the scientific method as if it was a fixed and universally agreed upon principle. In a show I saw recently by Neil DeGrasse Tyson, he explicitly ...
10
votes
7answers
1k views

Why have those scientists who rejected or opposed philosophy, still succeeded?

Preface: I know nothing about physics, and little about philosophy. This Scientific American article of 2015 May 8, this question, and this blog post of 2009 Nov 11 by Prof. Massimo Pigliucci ...
6
votes
6answers
619 views

Are neopagan religious views taken seriously by academic philosophers?

It seems 'normal' that philosophers of religion and divinities scholars in the West would focus mostly on the Abrahamic religions. Along with that, many philosophers have engaged with Eastern ...
4
votes
5answers
391 views

Can mathematics and physics be thought of as branches of philosophy?

I think that they can be viewed like that, with some suitable definition of philosophy. Then mathematics could be defined as one of the branches of philosophy in which theories are built on ...
-2
votes
5answers
2k views

Is philosophy a science? [duplicate]

When it comes to philosopshy it feels to me a bit like astrology, where there are some things that can work, but mostly because of auto-suggestion, or any other kind of suggestions. So, I wonder if ...
2
votes
4answers
698 views

Are mythological stories scientific explanations?

Are mythological stories scientific explanations? {It would seem so because Zeus, for example, was as early explanation of lightening.} Or are they stories/rhetoric? Or is story-telling or rhetoric ...
9
votes
2answers
15k views

What is the best order to read Aristotle in?

A question similar to this was asked, but mine is a little more specific. In any given writing of Aristotle I find concepts which it seems he explores in other places. Is there an order in which the ...
2
votes
2answers
100 views

“Syllogisms which produce understanding”

I remember reading somewhere that the aim of Aristotle's Prior and Posterior analytics was to show which kinds of syllogisms produce understanding. I do not remember where I read this but I think it ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Which came first - philosophy, religion or science?

I don't know if there are any answers, and it's a difficult question to answer without precisely defining "philosophy," etc. But I wondered if anyone is aware of any research or even casual musings ...
4
votes
1answer
82 views

Why is science treated as if it is entirely separate from philosophy? [duplicate]

A lot of people who I have spoken with in philosophy courses treat science as if it is completely separate from philosophy. Some scientists, like Stephen Hawking when he was still alive, seem to agree ...
4
votes
1answer
114 views

Who first studied “logical (ir)reversibility”?

Who first studied "logical (ir)reversibility" philosophically? By "logical (ir)reversibility" I mean questions like:Why is it easier to multiply large numbers than to factorize them? understand a ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

What is the historical relationship between physics and philosophy?

I often hear people say that physics is/was part of philosophy or that philosophy gave birth to physics but I think this isn't correct. Imagine a big country called anonati. After a civil war, ...
1
vote
1answer
296 views

Where does Aristotle say that it's better to know a little bit of higher things than much of lower things?

Where does Aristotle say that it's better to know a little bit of higher things (e.g., metaphysics) than a lot of lower things (e.g., physics)? It would seem this would be somewhere in his Ethics or ...