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Questions tagged [analytic-philosophy]

Analytic philosophy is one of two major branches of philosophy defined by its emphasis on formal logic, philosophy of language and scientism. Prevalent in the Anglo-American world from the early 20th century to the present day, analytic philosophy is the dominant philosophical discourse in academia and many mathematicians and computer scientists find themselves intrigued by it, due to the close relationship it often has with their areas of study.

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Analytic/continental philosophy and scientific realism

Can we say, accepting some exceptions, that overall, today and over history since the distinction between analytic and continental philosophy was introduced, analytic philosophers tend to be more ...
Starckman's user avatar
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Wittgenstein's Tractatus, 2.15121

Some context from Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus: 2.151 The form of representation is the possibility that the things are combined with one another as are the elements of the picture. 2.1511 Thus ...
Donald Wen's user avatar
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2 answers
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An early 20th century philosopher whose approach to teaching was "if you can't explain it to [my granddaughter] then you don't understand it yourself"

I'm not quite sure if it was his granddaughter, it could have been his daughter or niece? If her name was "Rose" then he referred to it as "Rose's rule" or something to his ...
Beauregard D's user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
233 views

The status of Ayer's genuine propositions

In the preface to the first edition of Language, Truth and Logic Ayer states ... I divide all genuine propositions into two classes: those which ... concern 'relations of ideas' and those which ...
Psionman's user avatar
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Why is identifying Frege's indirect sense with customary sense problematic?

In Miller's Philosophy of Language, it is explained that the identification of an expression's indirect sense (i.e. its referent in a doubly indirect context) with its customary sense (i.e. its ...
Dimen's user avatar
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Extending the use-mention distinction to account for variables and predicates

When we talk about the use-mention distinction, often the following is said: To use an expression means to refer to its meaning, to mention an expression means to refer to the expression itself. I ...
Harshit Rajput's user avatar
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29 views

Do relational metaphysics and analytic philosophy conflict via relational vs external properties?

You might first think, relations do indeed involve external properties of the relata. But I want to be careful. Are relational properties, a la relational quantum mechanics say, and external ...
J Kusin's user avatar
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Understanding F Jackson's article on "The Easy Examination Paradox"

The link for the paper is available here. This is the case of the headmistress who says that next week, there will be a surprise exam one of the afternoons. The girl students argue that it is ...
One_Cable5781's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
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Michael Dummett on the indeterminacy thesis

In his work "The Significance of Quine's Indeterminacy Thesis," Michael Dummett explores Quine's philosophy. In the beginning of section 3, he states: "Indeterminacy of translation ...
Amit Hagin's user avatar
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5 answers
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Is it possible for the sentence "bachelors are unmarried" to be fallible?

Is it absolutely certain that "bachelors are unmarried"? Are analytic propositions like these more certain than the cogito? Is this one area where philosophers throughout time have agreed ...
tryingtobeastoic's user avatar
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Going against the limits of language

I vaguely remember a sentence of Wittgenstein which was about the duty of philosophy: that is, to go against the limits of the language. This was in his late period of philosophy. What is the precise ...
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What is the place of early pragmatism in analytic philosophy?

What is the place of early pragmatism (James, Dewey, Peirce) in analytic philosophy? To break down the question: is early pragmatism considered as part of analytic philosophy; does it have a lot of ...
Starckman's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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How might Western Metaphysicists respond to the puzzle of King Milinda/Nagasena’s Chariot

Example of the puzzle How might Western Philosophers like Mereologcial Universalists or naturalistic metaphysicians reply to this?
Craigory 's user avatar
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11 answers
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Resisting a classic Buddhist Argument for Mereological Nihilism

I’ve been getting into mereology and this a classic Buddhist puzzle that he recommended. How can these premises be resisted? A. If wholes exist, then either wholes are identical with their parts or ...
Craigory 's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is Continental philosophy a continuation of metaphysics, analytic philosophy a departure from it?

Would it be correct to affirm that what has been called Continental philosophy (existentialism: Kierkeggard, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, Heidegger, Sartre; phenomenology: Husserl, Merleau-Ponty; vitalism:...
Starckman's user avatar
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1 answer
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Was Wittgenstein a mathematical finitist?

Wittgenstein was a notorious critic of set theory, calling it "laughable nonsense". However, he also wholeheartedly rejected intuitionist logic of Brouwer and Weyl, saying "it is ...
Dennis Kozevnikoff's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
309 views

What was Wittgenstein's real motive for wanting to move to Russia?

Ludwig Wittgenstein was no doubt a fascinating genius who was also very mysterious. He was known for doing outrageous things that no one saw coming, and there is one episode in particular that I find ...
Dennis Kozevnikoff's user avatar
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In which respects Quine was a pragmatist?

Quine is a representative of the analytic philosophy, a naturalist, a materialist, a robust realist, an empiricist, and a behaviourist. Additionnally, Quine is often regarded as a pragmatist (Godfrey‐...
Starckman's user avatar
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What are some journals where the papers employ technical logic and math notation?

Recently, I have been interested in philosophy papers that employ technical logic and/or math notation. I know of analytic philosophy, but I am looking specifically for papers that use technical ...
user107952's user avatar
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How can I optimize the attributes of God?

The Problem The three traditional attributes of God (in whichever tradition it is) are omnipotence, omniscience, and omnibenevolence. Under the assumption that reasonable discussion of God is possible,...
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Is analytic philsophy the most associated with "armchair" knowledge and is that subject to change?

*By armchair I mean knowledge one can gain by not going out into the world very far. And by my title I get the impression (perhaps mistakenly) that if armchair knowledge was lessened, so too would ...
J Kusin's user avatar
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Is Analytic Philosophy really just Language Philosophy

In a recent answer, someone posted this quote from Michael Dummet: What distinguishes analytical philosophy, in its diverse manifestations, from other schools is the belief, first, that a ...
David Gudeman's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
137 views

What does it mean to say, "Philosophy really started in 1884"?

I am looking into my old notes from a lecture I attended on Frege's Grundlagen, where the professor at some point jokingly said that philosophy started in 1884, with the publication of Grundlagen. I ...
Frank Booth's user avatar
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0 answers
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Does mathematics fall within the domain of analytical philosophy? [duplicate]

Summary of the problem: I’m unsure if it is correct to think of mathematics as analytic philosophy in the domain of counting and am posting to gather perspectives. Details and any research: make what ...
duckegg's user avatar
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Non-Kantian answers to the Kantian question of representation

In his book “Kant and the Foundations of Analytic Philosophy” Robert Hanna says that the central concern of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason is to answer the question of “how can the same judgment be at ...
Joa's user avatar
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1 answer
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Help needed in understanding an excerpt from PI (Section 509)

What if we asked someone, “In what sense are these words a description of what you see?” — and he answers: “I mean this by these words.” (Perhaps he was looking at a landscape.) Why is this answer “I ...
Dimen's user avatar
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What decides when a conceptual analysis is 'complete'?

When an analysis of a concept is given like "A bachelor is an unmarried male." How is it decided if the analysis is correct and complete? Is there any way we can 'check' an analysis?
r0k1m's user avatar
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1 answer
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Kant's philosophy for analytic philosophers

Can someone explain the role of Kant's philosophy in analytic philosophy? As an example, is the noumenon/phenomenon-distinction important for analytic philosophers? When we see a green tree, is the ...
reza-ebadi's user avatar
5 votes
7 answers
4k views

An argument that everything exists

This is similar to my previous question, here: An argument that everything is possible. I have an argument that everything exists. For, that which does not exist is not a thing at all. For example, ...
user107952's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
218 views

Is the split between Continental and Analytical comparable to the split between Empiricism and Rationalism, if so can it be reconciled?

Just as Kant reconciled empiricism and rationalism, is there a project to unify analytical and continental ? Or is Analytical philosophy irreversibly ingrained in Scientism while continental ...
Ash Rivers's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
108 views

Is Wittgenstein's proposition "the world is a collection of facts not things" similar to Hegel's claim that objects are not things but forces?

They both seem to suggest that objects are not defined by their discrete appearances but rather by the conceptual framework which allows us to perceive them. In case of Wittgenstein the world is all ...
Ash Rivers's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
684 views

Is G.E Moore's notion of goodness widely held and defended by contemporaneous philosophers?

I was wondering whether the idea that goodness cannot be defined and is just intuitively recognisable when observed, still holds significant weight? It seems somewhat similar to Plato's idea of ...
Jim stoke's user avatar
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1 answer
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Book recommendation for introduction to analytic philosophy for math major

I am a second year pure math major at university. I took a class on social theory last semester, and did not enjoy it very much because the texts seemed lean toward obscurantism to the point of ...
Tanishq Kumar's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
66 views

What are the reasons for which an idea can be subjective?

What are the reasons for which an idea can be subjective? The most common reason that is brought up often is that: it is subject of personal opinion, but an idea can be subjective for other reasons ...
Sayaman's user avatar
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-3 votes
1 answer
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Does a causal nexus imply the law of non contradiction or law of excluded middle?

Suggested to clarify: Do the major scientific, mathematical/analytic theories describing causal theories/"a causal nexus", physical theories, and some monist doctrines necessarily imply or ...
J Kusin's user avatar
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Wouldn’t analysis still be useful with a naturalized notion of contradiction?

I wonder why analysis receives so much attention when it’s very narrow with how we experience the world. That is its focus on logical and mathematical proofs. One reason for this focus must be its ...
J Kusin's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
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Are there contemporary analytic defenders of the view that pattern/meaning is metaphysically fundamental and directly knowable?

Background: Much of philosophy since Kant has taken for granted that our basic experience of reality is structured by our cognitive apparatus, including notably our background conceptual frameworks. ...
Avi C's user avatar
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3 votes
5 answers
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An argument against brute physical facts

I would like to know what anybody thinks of the following argument against brute physical facts, such as the idea that the material universe as a whole is a brute fact. A physical fact is taken to ...
Mark's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
327 views

Do philosophers in twentieth century tend to ignore the history of philosophy?

as I read the history of western philosophy up to early nineteenth century, I have a feeling that the philosophy is somehow "making progress" over this long period. Not that philosophers ...
Censi LI's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
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Can a representation be a system?

What's the definition of system? I am wondering if a representation like a graph be considered a system, or a system needs to have some kind of effect on something and not merely represent something. ...
Sayaman's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
114 views

Term for the dichotomy of blaming a philosophical counter-example on oneself vs. our commonsense

Imagine some philosopher answers a question of the form "What is X?". Then a critic points out that, according to this answer, O is not X, but we clearly consider it to be X. It seems that ...
303's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
314 views

Introduction to Formal Metaphysics

As I am very interested in Edward Zalta's research in Axiomatic Metaphysics, I wanted to read up on Formal Metaphysics. Would there be some introductory material that would help? Thank you in advance ...
pahohu's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
237 views

Are most philosophers analytic nowadays?

I know, the expression "analytic philosophy" is not something perfectly clear-cut, nor it is devoid of variations and multiplicity. The same can be said about "continental philosophy&...
Qfwfq's user avatar
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4 answers
595 views

Relationship between early Wittgenstein and late Wittgenstein

I think most books treat his early and late theories as inconsistent theories, in a sense that one can agree on either his early or late theory, but not both. However, I think the two theories are ...
Dimen's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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According to Wittgenstein, why are the laws of logic valid?

According to Wittgenstein's tractatus, A fact is composed of atomic facts. An atomic fact corresponds to an elemental proposition. (Picture theory) A proposition is a series of elemental propositions ...
Dimen's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
213 views

Relations and Properties

In predicate calculus there is no distinction between properties and relations---they are both just predicates. A property is a 1-ary predicate, and an n-ary relation is just an n-ary predicate. ...
PwNzDust's user avatar
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4 answers
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How do multiple time dimensions appear to allow the breaking or re-ordering of cause-and-efect in the flow of any one dimension of time?

Multiple time dimensions appear to allow the breaking or re-ordering of cause-and-effect in the flow of any one dimension of time. This and conceptual difficulties with multiple physical time ...
Sayaman's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
206 views

criticisms of mathematical structuralism

A popular, pretty modern trend in the philosophy of mathematics has been to treat mathematical objects as only possessing properties within the context of a mathematical structure. Does anyone know of ...
Joa's user avatar
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0 answers
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What do you call an illogical statement that seems logical because of grammar?

What do you call an illogical statement that seems logical because of grammar? Do you have any example of a philosopher who wrote a grammatical sentence in the hope of constructing an logical argument,...
Sayaman's user avatar
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0 votes
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What do you call something that neither true or false?

Let's say you say this country thought that this country was evil. This is neither false or true, because it's not like every people in the country had the same opinion. Maybe it's 70%, but using the ...
Sayaman's user avatar
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