Questions tagged [analytic-philosophy]

Analytic philosophy is one of two major branches of philosophy defined by its emphasis on formal logic, philosophy of language and scientism. Prevalent in the Anglo-American world from the early 20th century to the present day, analytic philosophy is the dominant philosophical discourse in academia and many mathematicians and computer scientists find themselves intrigued by it, due to the close relationship it often has with their areas of study.

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17
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5answers
3k views

Is logical positivism “dead” today?

John Passmore in 1967 said that logical positivism "...is dead, or as dead as a philosophical movement ever becomes." Are there any modern philosophers that advocate logical positivism the same ...
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Is it thought that analytic philosophy is in decline after the linguistic turn?

I would like to know from someone who has closely followed contemporary analytic philosophy if this idea has any currency. So by "is it thought" I mean is it a general trend or mood. The reason for ...
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What is the origin of the Continental vs. Analytic divide?

There's been much ado about the divisiveness between Heidegger and Husserl fans on the one side, with Frege and Russell stalwarts on the other. I'm mostly amused by accounts of name-calling between ...
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876 views

Can philosophy overcome “the two cultures” divide?

Snow noted a growing divide between "the two cultures" in Western society, scientists and "literary intellectuals", who became increasingly self-absorbed and incomprehensible to each other. One of ...
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3answers
342 views

Does this reformulation of the the analytic / synthetic distinction overcome Quine's objections?

He seemed to be asserting that synonymity cannot possibly be defined in a non-circular way. We attempt to show this is false on the basis of defining the Quine/Carnap example in a non-circular way. ...
8
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3answers
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How does Frege's definition of number solve the Julius Caesar problem?

How does Frege's definition of number solve the Julius Caesar problem? Frege's definition of number in the end of Foundation is such: the number belonging to the concept F is the extension of the ...
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1answer
135 views

What does bedeutung refer to in the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus?

Given that the literal translation of the german word bedeutung is "sense", what does it refer to in the semantics of the tractarian Wittgenstein, among these options? the meaning of the subatomic ...
22
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4answers
1k views

Which philosophers have done most to bridge the analytic/continental divide?

I am interested to find out work done in this direction by prominent philosophers in each tradition. My paradigm cases would be Richard Rorty on the analytic side and Alain Badiou on the continental ...
8
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6answers
322 views

What are some good resources for Analytically trained philosophers to get into more “continental” figures?

My question is similar to this one and this one, but with a slightly different spin. I am interested in knowing who are some analytically trained philosophers who write on historically "continental" ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Does Wittgensteins own solution to Russells Paradox actually work?

In the Tractatus, Wittgenstein attempts a solution of Russells paradox 3.333 A function cannot be its own argument, because the functional sign already contains the prototype of its own argument and ...
16
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3answers
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What are some ways to read Wittgenstein's Tractatus other than resolute/irresolute?

There are, at present, two dominant ways to read Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (TLP). One is called the irresolute reading, the other the resolute reading. The irresolute reading ...
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2answers
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Why does Wittgenstein say that the world is made of facts, and not things?

Proposition 1.1 of the Tractatus says: The world is the totality of facts, not of things. Does this mean that he regards the world being that of propositions whose truth can be determined - that ...
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4answers
176 views

Stephen Yablo's Aboutness and logical subtraction

I was finishing reading Aboutness by Yablo, but there is an intuitive definition that I do not get: He says on page 148 that: What is this relation of adding falsity, or being additionally false, or ...
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1answer
139 views

Is a posteriori analytic philosophy just science?

Analytic philosophy primarily tries to solve problems a priori. Science can be considered to be synthetic a posteriori, based of some a priori theoretical framework. But would any conclusions that you ...
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2answers
373 views

Understanding Sellars' The Myth of the Given rigorously

I understand the general view presented by Sellars in "Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind". Yet, I can't get rigorously convinced. The main point is shown in part XIII, specifically in section 35. ...
3
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1answer
104 views

Is Herbrand semantics a kind of term formalism?

Michael Genesereth and Eric Kao describe Herbrand semantics as follows: Herbrand semantics is an alternative semantics for First Order Logic based on truth assignments for ground sentences rather ...
3
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1answer
154 views

Why “philosophy never ends” for the tractarian Wittgenstein?

In the Prototractatus Wittgenstein wrote an additional section (called 6.55) which is seen as a possible third solution to the matter of building a perfect system of logic. This conclusion was ...
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3answers
475 views

Why should one read the Tracatus? [closed]

In the introduction to the Tractatus, Russell writes: In order to understand Mr Wittgenstein’s book, it is necessary to realize what is the problem with which he is concerned. In the part of his ...
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1answer
368 views

Which is the difference between Sache and Sachverhalt in the Tractatus?

As far as I know, When Russell asked to Wittgenstein to tell him the difference between Sache and Sachverhalt, Wittgenstein answered that "Sachverhalt" is what corresponds to an elementar sätze (an ...